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Seahawks Paper.. The Favre Perspective

Discussion in 'Packer Fan Forum' started by Pack93z, Jan 7, 2008.

  1. Pack93z

    Pack93z You retired too? .... Not me. I'm in my prime

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    A columnists view of Favre and Green Bay...

    http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/thiel/346322_thiel07.html?source=mypi

    Favre in charge: There's just no beating St. Brett
    By ART THIEL
    P-I COLUMNIST

    And now, they play against God.

    A stretch, perhaps. But only if you haven't been to Green Bay.

    Big-time pro athletes don't come more admired than Brett Favre.

    Pro sports franchises don't come more endearing than the Green Bay Packers. Fercripesakes, the team is community-owned.

    After a splendid 13-3 regular season, the Packers are recipients of the national hug as they commence Saturday their march to the desert and the inevitable fight for the soul of civilization against the remorseless New England Patriots in the Super Bowl.

    Wondering what the striking TV/movie scriptwriters were doing with their free time? Now you know.

    The Seahawks couldn't be more unwelcome if they were Mr. Potter plotting against George Bailey in "It's a Wonderful Life."

    The hiss has started in TV network headquarters. By the time it sweeps across a fruited plain desperate for feel-good sports stories (not you, Roger Clemens), the Seahawks will think they are in a hurricane.

    All the Seahawks did was win a playoff football game. Soon they will be seen as dastardlies who tie widows to railroad tracks.

    The feel is similar to the Super Bowl two years ago, when they went up against the national darling Steelers and Jerome Did-You-Know-He's-From-Detroit? Bettis. Even last week, the Seahawks were eight-hanky underdogs to the Washington Redskins, who were on an overwrought crusade for a slain teammate.

    But in terms of sloppy sentiment -- which is, as you know, much more important to a game's outcome than countering a zone blitz -- this may be the worst, because even cranky sportswriters can't work up literary snarkiness to flick at Favre and the Pack.

    Please don't think the Seahawks will do it for any of us.

    The team's two most important figures, coach Mike Holmgren and quarterback Matt Hasselbeck, came to Seattle from Green Bay and will go long with hosannahs about team and town.

    Calling Lambeau Field "the greatest venue in all of sports," Hasselbeck, after the 35-14 win over Washington, needed only to add light background music and sepia-toned photos to complete his impromptu Ken Burns mini-documentary.

    "I remember the first time I went back there, it was a huge deal to me," he said. "Green Bay, Wisconsin, is a special place to me. If it wasn't for that organization, I would have never gotten a chance. I would be wearing a suit to work every day. They helped me to fulfill my dream of playing in the NFL.

    "The people there are the same way. From Brett to (coach) Mike McCarthy, who was there when I was there, to the people in the front office, to the people who work in the pro shops, everybody.

    "It's just a special thing, when you get to play your friends."

    Stop, Matt, just for a moment. I'm getting all verklempt.

    There. I'm better now. Soft-focus lenses do that to me every time.

    Holmgren was no less effusive. Cue the eye moisture.

    "I'll probably have to say it a number of times this week -- Green Bay is a special place for people that like football," he said. " It is very unique. When my family was there, we had a wonderful time. We have fond memories.

    "Now we have to go back and play them. We're very excited about the opportunity."

    If the Oakland Raiders were alive today, they would retch.

    Then there's Favre, who a couple of weeks ago was anointed Sports Illustrated's annual Sportsman of the Year. A terrific story that accompanied the honor made clear it was Favre's humanity that has endeared him as much as his football achievements.

    Addiction to alcohol and painkillers threatened his health and marriage. After rehabbing his way to sobriety, his wife, Deanna, learned that she had breast cancer a week after her brother younger was killed in an accident.

    The upside of Favre's life was powerful too, including his long friendship with a developmentally disabled man taught by his mother, his foundation's donation of $4 million to worthy causes, the rousing of nationwide help for his home-state victims of Katrina, as well as his life-changing influence on one-time miscreant Koren Robinson, the former Seahawks receiver.

    Then there was the time he threw for 400 yards on "Monday Night Football" the day after his dad died. SI wrote: "Grown men around Green Bay still tear up when recalling that game."

    Sheesh. And the Seahawks plan to slam this gent to the fabled frozen tundra in front of his hometown fans? Good luck with that.

    "He means everything to these people," Packers receiver Donald Driver told SI. "He's not only our leader, he's the symbol of the franchise, of the whole town. There's a generation of fans in Green Bay who don't know this team ever existed without Brett."

    This year, all Favre is doing is a Cal Ripken/Jack Nicklaus/Curt Schilling combo job by having nearly a career year at an age when he should be broadcasting.

    Arrayed against this Alps of history, sentiment, courage and romance, all the Seahawks have to accomplish is something the franchise has done once in its history, and not in a quarter-century -- win a road game in the playoffs.

    Daunting as is that prospect, the football fates will make sure things only get worse.

    If the Seahawks win, there is no doubt the next opponent will feature Oprah at cornerback, Tom Hanks at wide receiver and Walter Cronkite as coach.
     
  2. Pack93z

    Pack93z You retired too? .... Not me. I'm in my prime

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    More...

    http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/football/346324_favre07.html

    Packers' Favre still throwing fastballs in his 17th season
    By JON NAITO
    P-I REPORTER

    On a snowy, late November night at Qwest Field in the 2006 season, his elbow still hurting from a hit he absorbed the previous week, Green Bay Packers quarterback Brett Favre made his 232nd consecutive start.

    His streak had survived numerous injuries, his struggles with drugs and alcohol, and most painful, the death of his father. But on this Monday night in a season in which Favre's Packers would finish 8-8 and miss the playoffs, he looked every bit his 37 years.

    After the 34-24 loss, he did not speak with the media, looking ragged and worn as he made his way to the team bus.

    Several Packers, when asked if Favre's play had diminished, if time finally had caught up with the toughest man to ever play quarterback in the NFL, reacted in incredulous tones, as if someone had questioned their own capabilities.

    "Brett seemed to be the same Brett to me," fullback William Henderson told the Seattle P-I afterward. "He's still trying to be a playmaker, doing whatever he can for us. Going downfield, trying to get us in position to score. Still the same guy."

    In any other context, Henderson's statement would have been taken as a spirited show of support from a longtime teammate watching his friend near the end of a brilliant career. But Henderson's words resonated with sincerity. So did those of the other Packers. Brett was still Brett, they insisted.

    A season later, there are no longer questions about Favre's health or if another substandard season would affect his Hall of Fame career, if he had been too stubborn and prideful, incapable of letting go of a career that had begun flickering out.

    "He's got really good receivers and an arm that won't quit," Seahawks free safety Brian Russell said Sunday after the Seahawks advanced to play the Packers. "He's like Nolan Ryan. Even when he got old, he was throwing fireballs. We know it's going to be a huge test.

    "He's seen it all. He'll take a risk. You think you got a guy covered, and he'll throw it back shoulder or throw it up and make it a jump ball. You got your work cut out for you."

    The resurgence of Favre, 38, has coincided with the maturation of a young, talented roster, and an improved defense, a combination that produced a 13-3 regular season and an NFC North Division title.

    In his 17th season, Favre is again among the league leaders in most passing categories. During the season, he became the league's leader in wins by a quarterback, touchdown passes, pass attempts and yards. He also owns the career mark for completions, and his consecutive-starts streak sits at 253 games (273 including playoff games), the second-longest mark in NFL history.

    The Seahawks, who will face Favre and the Packers on Saturday in a divisional playoff game at Lambeau Field, are aware that following a long diet of anonymous, journeymen quarterbacks, facing a player who was recently named Sports Illustrated's Sportsman of the Year, is not like facing Chris Redman or Todd Collins.

    "There's no question this guy is a future Hall of Famer," said Seahawks defensive back Jordan Babineaux. "He's seen a lot of defenses and played a lot of football. There are no tricky ways to get around Brett Favre. You have to play sound and be mistake-free."
     
  3. Pack93z

    Pack93z You retired too? .... Not me. I'm in my prime

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    Even a little more... some players early comments..

    http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/football/346327_hawk07.html

    Kerney provides Hawks' example: He knows what it takes to win at Lambeau
    By CLARE FARNSWORTH
    P-I REPORTER

    KIRKLAND -- The Seahawks defense has followed Patrick Kerney's lead all season. Play relentlessly. Stop the run. Apply pressure to the opposing quarterback. Produce turnovers. Never give up, no matter how big the opponent or how large the deficit.

    This lead-by-example strategy needs to continue Saturday, when the Seahawks -- and their defensive end who led the NFC with 14 1/2 sacks -- play the Green Bay Packers at fabled Lambeau Field in the divisional round of the NFL playoffs.

    In 2002, Kerney was part of an Atlanta Falcons team that went into Green Bay, Wis., and emerged with a victory. It was the first time the Packers had lost at Lambeau Field in the postseason.

    "That was certainly a great win for us back in Atlanta," Kerney said Saturday night, after the Seahawks had rallied for a 35-14 victory over the Washington Redskins at Qwest Field. "It was snowing. Lambeau Field. It's what you play football for."

    For the Seahawks, even more important than the fact that the Falcons won that day is how they won. As the Seahawks did against the Redskins, the Falcons shut down the Packers' running game (56 yards) and pressured iconic quarterback Brett Favre into making mistakes.

    Two interceptions and a fumble in, as it turned out, a 27-7 Falcons victory.

    Before that January day in 2003, the Packers had been invincible on their home field during the playoffs -- having won 11 in a row at Lambeau by an average score of 27-12.

    Since that loss to Kerney and the Falcons, the Packers' postseason record at Lambeau is 1-1. The win came in overtime against the Seahawks after the 2003 season, while the loss came to the Minnesota Vikings in the 2004 playoffs.

    The quest for the Seahawks also has historical significance, because in 32 seasons they have won on the road in the playoffs once. That came in Miami after the 1983 season, when they upset the Dolphins to advance to the AFC Championship Game.

    Since then, the Seahawks have lost playoff games in Los Angeles (1983, to the Raiders, a week after beating the Dolphins), Miami (1984), Houston (1987), Cincinnati (1988), Green Bay (2003) and Chicago (2006), plus the Super Bowl on a neutral field in Detroit after the 2005 season.

    But back to the present, and the immediate task at hand -- finding a way to beat a Packers team that went 13-3 this season and has had a week to rest.

    "The biggest thing for us going into Lambeau is to make sure we slow down that run when the Packers go four-wide or three-wide," Pro Bowl linebacker Julian Peterson said.


    Then they need to find a way to rattle Favre, and get him to make the kinds of mistakes he has mostly avoided this season -- throwing into double coverage (15 interceptions, his fewest since 1996); trying to force a play when it's not there (66.5 completion percentage, a career high); fumbling while being sacked (15 sacks, his fewest since 2004).

    It all begins with shutting down the running game and getting the Packers in passing situations, just as the Seahawks did with Clinton Portis and with Todd Collins against the Redskins. Portis averaged 2.6 yards on 20 carries. Collins, who had not thrown an interception during the Redskins' four-game winning streak to end the regular season, had two fourth-quarter passes picked off and returned for touchdowns, by Marcus Trufant and Jordan Babineaux

    "If you let any quarterback in the NFL get comfortable, it's just going to be a long day -- especially against Favre," said defensive tackle Craig Terrill, who had one of the Seahawks' three sacks of Collins.

    "If you don't get to him with four-man pressure, you're letting the whole team down as a defensive line."

    The weakness of the Packers' offensive line is their young guards, Daryn Colledge and Jason Spitz, who could have problems handling the Seahawks' quickness.

    But the Packers are more pass-oriented than the Redskins to begin with, and at their best when Favre is operating from a five-receiver set that spreads the defense and leaves him alone in the backfield.

    It will put a premium on the ability of the secondary to cover the Packers' receivers, especially Donald Driver (82 receptions for 1,048 yards) and Greg Jennings (17.4-yard average, 12 touchdowns), and make getting some pressure on Favre imperative.

    And doing it in a place where the Packers are 7-1 this season, and 12-2 in the postseason.

    "It's going to be a high-energy environment," Kerney said. "I'm sure it will be nice and cold, and it's that gritty, late-season football that you love."

    Even if it's in a venue opposing teams love to hate.

    "Yes, they're loud, and they're going to be screaming at us all game," Kerney said of the Lambeau faithful. "We just can't let it affect us. I think the gravity of the game, the gravity of the situation, will prevent that from happening."

    Kerney's teammates need to take it from someone who knows and, as they have all season, follow his lead.


    UP NEXT: GREEN BAY
    WHEN/WHERE: Saturday, 1:30 p.m., Lambeau Field, Green Bay, Wis.

    PACKERS RECORD: 13-3, which earned them the NFC's No. 2 seed and a first-round bye in the playoffs.

    WHERE THEY RANK: No. 2 on offense (21st rushing, second passing); No. 11 on defense (14th rushing, 12th passing)

    SERIES: Packers lead 6-5 in the regular season and 1-0 in the postseason; Seahawks coach Mike Holmgren is 1-3 at Lambeau against his former team.

    STAR POWER: Brett Favre. The Packers' venerable -- and still valuable -- quarterback has passed his way to several NFL records, and his team back into the playoffs, in his 17th season. Even at 38, Favre continues to play with enthusiasm. And he can still make plays; his 95.7 passer rating is the third highest of his career and his best since 1996.

    UNSUNG HERO: Ryan Grant. The Packers acquired him from the Giants for a sixth-round draft choice just before the season. All he did after taking over for an injured Vernand Morency at midseason was rush for 956 yards (second most in the league in the second half of the season), average 5.1 yards per carry and score eight touchdowns.

    ON THE SPOT: Mark Tauscher. The right tackle draws the task of dealing with Patrick Kerney, the Seahawks defensive end who led the NFC with 14 1/2 sacks. Kerney did not register a sack Saturday against the Redskins, but his relentless efforts allowed teammates to make plays. Tauscher has size (6-3, 315) and smarts, but slow feet and short arms, making him vulnerable to outside speed and also inside moves from pass-rushers.

    BURNING QUESTION: Which playoff Favre shows up? The one who has turned back the clock, looking like the player who was 8-4 in the postseason from 1993-97 by throwing 23 touchdowns and 10 interceptions for a 92.0 passer rating? Or the one who has been 2-5 since '97, throwing 16 interceptions and 11 touchdowns for a 70.8 rating?

    FAMILIAR FACES: Wide receiver Koren Robinson, linebacker Tracy White, linebackers coach Winston Moss and pro personnel assistant Tim Terry are former Seahawks. General manager Ted Thompson, director of college scouting John Dorsey and personnel assistant to the GM John Schneider also worked for the Seahawks.

    THE LAST WORD: "I think three years ago we were saying, 'He's done.' And I was saying the same thing. And here we are." -- Favre on Favre
     
  4. mateus

    mateus Cheesehead

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    that first article was mint! you can really feel the "its the pack, its hopeless, just give them the game and go home like gentlemen would ya!"
    hehehe
     
  5. PackCrazed4

    PackCrazed4 Cheesehead

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    Loved the 1st article! Just enough sappy sarcasm mixed in with some moans and grumbles to get me pumped for the weekend! :p
     
  6. Fuzznuts

    Fuzznuts Cheesehead

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    I'm sure this quote made some people happy....

    not!
     
  7. BCheezy

    BCheezy Cheesehead

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    You assume the tone of one article can represent feelings of the entire Seahawk nation. The fact that the media loves the Packers is just more motivation to kick your ***. The same way it is everytime we play an east coast team, especially last week when we had to play "The hottest team in the NFL." Brett will have to deal with Kerney, Peterson, and tatupu all day long. There will be rushers, there will be sacks, there will be blood.
     
  8. cheesey

    cheesey Cheesehead

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    Like i NEED any more reason to get pumped up!!!!LOLOLOL!!! :lol:
     
  9. mateus

    mateus Cheesehead

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    and it should be a great game!
    but none the less its pretty funny to read through these articles and barely see a glimpse of hope and "maybe people wont hate us...much...if we beat them this week..."
    -Matt
     
  10. packerfan4ever

    packerfan4ever Cheesehead

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    i think brett will be on the top of his game grant will move the ball the shovel pass or what ever they forget grant can catch and run and then there is jackson i feel this a big win :D
     
  11. HawkBeliever

    HawkBeliever Cheesehead

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    From the national media perspective, it does seem like the Hawks are setup for matchs in which we are raining on the parade of some Disney script if we win. Last week they had to play against Sean Taylor's ghost. This week we have to play against your universally loved Favre in what could be his swan song (I'll believe that when I see it after having heard about his imminent retirement for the last few years)... But while it gets some fans fired up and makes for good sports radio topics, I think stuff like that has very little effect on the guys who actually will be playing the game on Sunday.
     
  12. Zombieslayer

    Zombieslayer Cheesehead

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    Hawk - Agreed on your last sentence. The other stuff is just fluff to get more hits (thus more advertising money). The guys playing the game will be concentrating on doing their jobs.
     
  13. PackCrazed4

    PackCrazed4 Cheesehead

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    Haha, true Al, that didn't exactly get me pumped up... I've been pumped since Saturday, that just a little something to add to the anxiousness! GOD ITS ONLY TUESDAY!!!!!!!!!!!!! What are we supposed to do till then? lol!
     
  14. retiredgrampa

    retiredgrampa Cheesehead

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    As the season rolled by, it seemed as if every game had some special significance(sp?), this one is just another in that line, albeit a possible season-ender. This one will go to the team, emphasis TEAM, that wants it more and will pay the heavy price. As usual, our OL and DL play will largely determine the outcome. Tausch must handle Kearney, if that's possible. We've got to handle the blitz that's sure to come. It's good that we finally have almost the whole team healthy. No more excuses. If we can't handle Seattle, what chance would we have againest the Pats? GO PACK GO!!
     
  15. mateus

    mateus Cheesehead

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    very true hawk!
    and well if the boys concentrated on the media instead of there game they shouldnt be up in the highest level football league in america. but the media does have an impact on the fans...and the question im raising up is: how do the fans feel if the media sees this as a hopeless battle?
    also, a little out of context but, how did you guys feel when it looked liek sean taylor's ghost came to the field to back those 14 points? that was a freakishly good show!
     
  16. HawkBeliever

    HawkBeliever Cheesehead

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    People out here don't feel hopeless at all. I think a lot of fans from all teams kind of enjoy feeling disrespected and having an "Its us against the world attititude." Seattle definately has that as a predominant theme in its fan base. We are so geographically isolated (our nearest team is 800 miles away in San Fransisco). We haven't won a SuperBowl. We don't really have any hardcore rivalry (exacerbated by moving from the NFC to the AFC and back to the NFC). And as of late we have played in a weak division. So its easy for other fans to diss us at times or worse, be totally apathetic about the Hawks.

    I could care less. Its fun to have stuck with the team so long and to now seeing them succeed. We definately appreciate the post season victories out here after a 20 year drought. But there are definately those fans who relish the perception that nobody pays attention to the Hawks.

    Re: the Skins game.... Man, that was a freakin low morale point. We went form being up 13 - 0 to down 14-13 and having given up a bizarre onside kick all within 3 minutes. I don't buy into the thinking that someone's spirit is influencing games (frankly, I think ST would be more interested in comforting and protecting his family than messing with a football game if he did have wordly influence at this point). But that inspiration that ST gave the Skins was definately an X-factor that made them dangerous. They really played above their heads for a month. But it all fell back to earth rather rapidly after their kicker missed.

    When that all went down, I just kept repeating "This is not good....." Thank goodness the Hawks D made a stand. I was really impressed by how they did given how much they were on the field at the end of the game.
     
  17. Zombieslayer

    Zombieslayer Cheesehead

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    Heck yeah! I'd love to see the Packers win the SB. Nobody will think it. We'd be a HUGE underdog if it's against NE or Indy. Nobody respects the NFC. Everyone goes on and on how it's the weaker conference.

    Just to let you know, if you guys win, I'll be rooting for you first to beat the Cows (my worst enemies) then the AFC team. You'll be HUGE underdogs, and it would be sweet if you could pull it off.

    Nothing better than being underdogs and winning. If everyone thinks you're going to win and you win, it's just not as sweet.
     
  18. mateus

    mateus Cheesehead

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    gotta say im you and zombieslayer for the whole underdogedness of these teams!
    its why i think saturday is gonna be a great game, two teams people expect nothing out of have a chance to go all the way! w00t!
    and i see what you mean by isolation...thats absolutly insane! ridiculous even!
     
  19. Heatherthepackgirl

    Heatherthepackgirl Cheesehead

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    HI SAR!!!! This has been such along wait, but now only two more days...WOO HOOOO cannot wait.
     

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