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top 50 prospects

Discussion in 'Draft Talk' started by ivo610, Feb 20, 2012.

  1. ivo610

    ivo610 Cheesehead

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  2. FrankRizzo

    FrankRizzo Cheesehead

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    Well, we pick at #28. Probably about 10 guys they have ranked HIGHER than 28 WILL be available at our pick at 28, and about 10 guys they have lower than 28 will actually be gone before our pick.

    So with that being said, here's the guys I hope we get one or two of between our first two picks, however they shape up with trade ups or downs.....

    10. Melvin Ingram, DL-OLB, South Carolina -- Few defensive prospects raised their game and draft stock as Ingram did last season. He's a playmaker who stands out in almost every aspect of the defense, with his ability to make plays behind the line of scrimmage or out to the flanks.
    12. Michael Brockers, DL, LSU* -- Brockers capped off a tremendous sophomore season with an awesome showing in the national title game. He's an explosive interior lineman who eats up blocks and collapses the pocket.
    14. Fletcher Cox, DL, Mississippi State* -- Cox is one of the hidden values at the defensive line position. Scouts feel he's one of few available three-down defenders and offers the ability to play as many as four different positions on the defensive line.
    15. Courtney Upshaw, DE-OLB, Alabama -- Upshaw was the feared pass-rusher in Alabama's suffocating defense, and scouts expect much the same from him at the next level. The lingering question is which position will Upshaw play at the next level, outside linebacker or defensive end? Or both?
    20. Nick Perry, DE-OLB, USC* -- The Trojan underclassman is a pass-rushing terror who combines quickness and speed to harass opposing quarterbacks. He offers tremendous potential and can stand up over tackle or be used out of a three-point stance.
    26. Dontari Poe, DT, Memphis* -- Poe is a massive defender who easily moves his body around the field, making plays behind the line of scrimmage or out to the flanks. He offers a tremendous amount of upside potential and has the ability to play in a variety of defensive systems.
    31. Vinny Curry, DE-OLB, Marshall -- Curry harassed quarterbacks for three years playing at Marshall and is one of the best pass-rushers in this draft. He's athletic, fluid and exceptionally quick. Whether Curry lines up at outside linebacker or defensive end all depends on how fast he runs at the Combine.
    32. Whitney Mercilus, DE-OLB, Illinois* -- Mercilus is yet another pass-rusher who graces the top part of the draft. He came out of nowhere in 2011 and was omnipresent behind the line of scrimmage. He's another prospect who projects to multiple positions in the defense.
    36. Brandon Thompson, DT, Clemson -- Thompson is the top player from a talented Clemson defense. He's a penetrating tackle who opponents struggle to stop from the snap of the ball. He's also well-liked by scouts for his ability to lead by example.
    42. Andre Branch, DE-OLB, Clemson -- Branch is the next in a long line of athletic pass-rushers who have come from the Clemson program. He forcefully makes plays behind the line of scrimmage and easily chases the action in pursuit. Like many of his predecessors from the school, many question his every-down intensity.
    47. Jerel Worthy, DT, Michigan State* -- The junior is an explosive interior lineman who consistently penetrates the line of scrimmage, then makes plays in the backfield. Worthy offers starting potential for the next level, but must attend to the details of his position and consistently play with proper mechanics.
     
  3. ivo610

    ivo610 Cheesehead

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    Worthy is a beast and I would be thrilled to have him
     
  4. Wood Chipper

    Wood Chipper Fantasy Football Guru

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    I like the sound of curry.
     
  5. Big E

    Big E Cheesehead

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    Frank, I like that list, but I would add Devon Still to it.

    21. Devon Still, DL, Penn State -- Still is a nuts-and-bolts type of defender in the middle of the line. He's explosive, tough and does the little things well. Still is not a play-maker with eye popping production, rather a steady lineman who won't make many mistakes.
     
  6. FrankRizzo

    FrankRizzo Cheesehead

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    I like Still too, but we beed guys who are play-makers, who do get to the QB enough to have to double-team them.
    That's what Jenkins did, and what opened up things for the OLB's more.
    From what they describe Still as, we have a few guys like that IMO.
     
  7. FrankRizzo

    FrankRizzo Cheesehead

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    http://www.jsonline.com/sports/packers/draft-outlook-es4aae2-140451293.html

    Melvin Ingram, DE-OLB, South Carolina: 6-1, 264. Played almost every D-line and LB position. "He's a little guy that's not explosive," one scout said. "I don't know where you play him. He's OK. He's not that good of an athlete." Played extensively off the bench for three seasons before starting as a senior. "If you line him up as an end in a 4-3 he's going to get blocked a lot," one scout said. "Outside backer in a 3-4 is probably the best starting point for him. He's got good temperament. He will bring something to your team from a toughness-intangible (standpoint). Is he an elite pass rusher? Absolutely not. Is he an elite run-down defender? Absolutely not. But he's a good football player who has to move around and play a bunch of different positions. A creative coach like (Bill) Belichick could do something with this guy." Finished with 21½ sacks.
    Fletcher Cox*, DT, Mississippi State: 6-4, 298. Started two of his three seasons, finishing with 8½ sacks. "He's probably a pure 4-3 DT who can give you reps at DE," one scout said. "He's got the athletic ability to be a better pass rusher in the future than his numbers have indicated so far." Nicknamed "The Beast." Said another scout: "Guy can run all day. He's explosive, strong hands, good hips. He's country. He's hard. He looooves football."
    Michael Brockers*, DT, Louisiana State: 6-7, 322. Played just two seasons before renouncing his final two years of eligibility. "Cox is a quicker-twitch guy than Brockers," one scout said. "Brockers can play 3-4 end or 4-3 DT. He's probably a little stouter against the run than Cox. Cox is probably a better athlete." Finished with two sacks. "He's a young kid and the light is just starting to go on," another scout said. "He hasn't even touched his ceiling yet. He's very powerful. He's a really good two-gapper. Occasionally, he's got a little bit of pass rush. Vonnie Holliday was a better athlete. This kid is bigger."
    Dontari Poe*, NT, Memphis: 6-4, 346. Finished with five sacks in 35 games (30 starts). "He's probably the most athletic D-lineman in this draft over 300 pounds," one scout said. "He is phenomenally gifted with athleticism. He's not fat at all. Different level of competition. He has flashes of dominance. He's a well-spoken kid." Prototypical space-eater. "He has ability, OK?" another scout said. "I wouldn't say he can't move. You have to understand, that was a poor, poor team. That lad had very little help."
    Devon Still, DT, Penn State: 6-5, 303. Built in imposing fashion a la Justin Harrell. "He has a lot of talent, but he's up and down," one scout said. "I don't understand that. I don't think it's lack of effort. He fits the 5-technique (DE in a 3-4), what you want them to look like." Two-year starter with 10½ sacks. Art Still, his uncle, was a Pro Bowl DE for Kansas City in the 1980s. "He's a flash player," another scout said. "But down in, down out, he's a developmental guy."
    Dont'a Hightower*, ILB-OLB, Alabama: 6-2, 265. Played ILB in the Crimson Tide's base 3-4 but often put his hand down and rushed on passing downs. "Does he flash big-time plays?" one scout said. "Yeah, he does. Does he dominate like a guy 6-3, 265 should? Not on a consistent basis." Blew out his knee in Game 4 of 2009 and, according to some scouts, has yet to play back to his old form. "He's got the ability of the guy the Raiders took (Rolando McClain)," another scout said. "Some people don't know how tough he is. The knock on him is if he really inserts. But he is strong. I've seen him take his hand and just stand up guards." He tried to power rush tackles and ended up with five sacks. "He's capable of playing outside (linebacker)," a third scout said. "He can do anything you ask him to do."
    Courtney Upshaw, OLB, Alabama: 6-1½, 272. Projects as an OLB in a 3-4 or a strong-side LB in a 4-3. "The only reason Upshaw could go ahead of Ingram is because Upshaw actually played up and down and Ingram played all over the place," one scout said. "I don't think Upshaw was really outstanding in the Senior Bowl. I thought he was just ordinary. He's very physical, but he gets cut a lot. That's because he's stiff." Two-year starter with 16½ sacks. "(People) think he's Cornelius Bennett and he's not," another scout said. "He's a good, tough, nasty college football player that I think will get blocked a lot in the NFL." Scored just 9 on the 50-question Wonderlic intelligence test. "He's just a tough (expletive)," a third scout said. "He's really not a burn the edge guy. He is not fast. He's built like a fire hydrant. Maybe a 3-4 team will take him in the first."
    Whitney Mercilus*, DE, Illinois: 6-4, 261. Didn't become a starter until 2011 and then broke out with 16 sacks. "He's a teaser," one scout said. "I don't know why he came out. He looks like a 4-3 DE to me. He doesn't do anything special." Trying to provide for his Haitian immigrant parents. "I think there's a degree of stiffness that will limit him," another scout said. "He's got the measurables and production. I just want to see him move like an athlete."
    Nick Perry*, DE, Southern California: 6-3, 271. Played with his hand down for the Trojans unlike Clay Matthews, who almost always played standing up. Some scouts think he can play LB and others don't. "He's an undersized 4-3 DE," one scout said. "He's not as powerful as Trent Cole. He tries to finesse his way around guys." Two-year starter with 21½ sacks. "He wore out Stanford's junior left tackle (Jonathan Martin)," another scout said. "He and Clay Matthews didn't play the same way. He's tall and linear built. Yeah, he can rush the passer."
    Jared Crick, DE, Nebraska: 6-4, 279. Three-year starter who was lost for the season in Game 5 last fall with a torn pectoral muscle. "All about football," one scout said. "War daddy. Tough guy. Good enough athlete to play 5-technique (3-4 DE). Strong hands. Plays with pride. He's got some stiffness, but he's got enough flexibility to squeeze and control and go laterally and make plays." Finished with 20 sacks. "He does have a lot of sacks but he got a lot of them when (Ndamukong) Suh was there," another scout said. "He does play hard, I'll tell you what. This guy chases the ball all the time."
    Vinny Curry, DE-OLB, Marshall: 6-3, 266.Three-year starter with 26½ sacks. "Very, very talented football player," one scout said. "He may have a chance to stand up and be an outside linebacker. He's tough. The guy plays hard." Moved around rather well at the Senior Bowl when the coaches gave him a chance to play standing up.
    Jerel Worthy*, DT, Michigan State: 6-2, 308. Often compared to DT Phil Taylor, who went 21st to Cleveland last year and had a successful rookie season. "He's got a ton of ability," one scout said. "He could be first round without any question. You just worry about guys that have ability and play lazy for most of their career. Because when they make money they're usually not very good. He's that kind of guy." Three-year starter with 12 sacks. "I didn't want to like the guy," another scout said. "But you know what? Guy's a pretty good player. He needs to be more consistent, but when he turns it up he can rush the passer."
    Brandon Thompson, DT, Clemson: 6-2, 314. Three-year starter with 4½ sacks. "Short and square," one scout said. "Fits the 4-3 as a DT. I thought he was OK, not great. Kind of a meat and potatoes interior player." Hails from a program that seems to worry a lot of personnel people. "Those Clemson guys don't translate to the NFL very good," another scout said. "They just don't play well in the NFL."
    Kendall Reyes, DT, Connecticut: 6-4, 299. Probably best-suited to play 3-technique in a 4-3. Just doesn't seem stout enough to resist the run as a 3-4 DE. "He's more of a run-around guy," one scout said. "He's a better athlete than Brandon Thompson, but Thompson is stronger. He's got great ability, but he's soft. He can't fight through adversity. When (expletive) gets tough, he can't finish it out." Started 41 of 49 games, finishing with 11½ sacks. "He's such an underachiever," another scout said. "He doesn't play up to his ability, but it's there. I think he gets overdrafted because of it."
    Alameda Ta'amu, NT, Washington: 6-2½, 348. Made himself a lot of money with a terrific week at the Senior Bowl. "You can't single-block him," one scout said. "He's athletic for his size." Started 42 of 50 games, finishing with 7½ sacks. "He's very much like Paul Soliai of the Dolphins," another scout said. "He is a true space-eater. He didn't play like that (the Senior Bowl) all year. He did have a good Senior Bowl, he really did. He's got a big (expletive) and great big thick thighs on him."
    Andre Branch, OLB, Clemson: 6-4, 259. Displayed major improvement as a senior when he posted 10½ of his 17½ sacks. "He's another teaser," one scout said. "He's got ability. But he's a lot of fluff is what I think." Seems capable of playing in 3-4 or 4-3 schemes. "Clemson always (expletive) me up," another scout said. "I don't trust those guys there."
    Chase Minnifield, CB, Virginia: 6-0, 187. His father, Frank, was a rugged little press CB for the Browns for nine years. "Other than Claiborne he's probably the smartest of all of them as far as instincts and awareness," one scout said. "I scouted his dad. He could possibly go first round. Depends how he runs." Played extensively for four seasons and intercepted 13 passes. "He's a consummate professional," another scout said. "He's an ideal Cover 2 corner. He kind of plays the game like his dad did. Speed, or lack thereof, will be his issue."
     
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  8. FrankRizzo

    FrankRizzo Cheesehead

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    Crick sure sounds like a Packer.... not sure if he really was only 279 pounds though. I like Adam Carriker a lot more though, similar guy from the same school, but Adam is bigger and has now shown he can play well in a 34 as a DE.

    Give us 2 guys from the above list, plus one or two or three of the free agents: Carriker, Manny Lawson, and Jerry Hughes (cheap trade), and I would bet our defense is in the top 15 instead of #31 or #32! THIS season.
     
  9. Southpaw

    Southpaw Endorphin Junkie

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    I'm still wondering how much of Crick's production was a result of playing next to Suh and he's coming off a pretty nasty injury.

    I actually like Billy Winn (Boise State) I think he's a sleeper and should be around in the 3rd. He's big in body size for a defensive end much like Jenkins was, and is great at getting interior pressure, also like Jenkins.

    I like him and Mercilus as the two big potential additions to the defense,
     
  10. Big E

    Big E Cheesehead

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    Crick played one year with Suh and one year without Suh (not counting this past year that he was injured). His numbers in those two years were almost identical. In 2009 with Suh, he had 73 tackles, 12.5 TFL, 9.5 sacks. In post-Suh 2010, he had 70 tackles, 14.5 TFL, 9.5 sacks.
     
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  11. FrankRizzo

    FrankRizzo Cheesehead

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    That's as identical as it can get really.
    I wonder if that is really his weight. If so, he needs to (should) put on 20+ pounds for our DE spot.
     
  12. FrankRizzo

    FrankRizzo Cheesehead

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    [​IMG]
    Melvin Ingram had every reason to smile after a stellar Monday workout that inched Ingram closer to being a top-10 pick.
    The defensive linemen again turned heads with some outstanding workouts at the combine. Players who weigh in excess of 300 pounds were regularly running times under 5.0 seconds in the 40, an inconceivable thought just a few years ago. Several star players improved their draft stock, while a few lesser-known prospects also jumped out with solid performances today.
    Risers

    Melvin Ingram, South Carolina: Ingram continues to impress NFL teams, and his combine workout will push him further north on draft boards. He ran under 4.7 seconds on his first attempt in the 40, which included a quick 10-yard split of 1.65 seconds. Ingram was near flawless in position drills. He displayed great lateral movement skills, lost almost no momentum changing direction and was always on balance. His hands violently struck the bags in defensive line drills and Ingram looked incredibly athletic during linebacker drills. Don't be surprised if Ingram breaks into the draft's first 12 picks.
    Nick Perry, USC: Perry turned in a workout for the ages. He was fast, posting 40 times in the low 4.6-second range at 271 pounds. He was strong, completing 35 repetitions on the bench press. Perry was also explosive and touched 38.5 inches in the vertical jump. He later looked incredibly athletic in all position drills. Perry solidified himself as a first round pick. The question is how early will he be selected during the first 32 choices?
    Dontari Poe, Memphis: Poe was impressive from start to finish. He posted 44 reps on the bench, leading all participants in this year's combine. He later motored his 346-pound frame for a 40 time under 5.0 seconds, which included an impressive 1.71-second 10-yard split. During position drills, Poe moved more like a linebacker than a big-bodied defensive lineman. He was quick, explosive and has scouts excited about his upside potential.
    Whitney Mercilus, Illinois: Mercilus was fast, timing his 40s between 4.65 and 4.68 seconds. He looked very athletic in drills, displaying a lot of quickness and the ability to swiftly move in any direction of the field. Mercilus showed a terrific burst of speed and the ability to turn it on in one quick step, which has scouts thinking he can line up at defensive end or stand up over tackle as a rush linebacker.
    Kendall Reyes, UConn: Reyes turned in a complete combine workout and leaves Indianapolis with an elevated draft grade. His 4.88-second 40 time was solid. His 36 repetitions on the bench should quell concerns about his strength at the point of attack. During the practice session Reyes looked incredibly quick-footed and smooth moving around the field.
    Andre Branch, Clemson: Branch averaged 4.7 seconds on his 40 times to start off the day, including one of the quickest 10-yard splits of 1.61 seconds. He practiced to that speed during drills, displaying the ability to immediately change direction and quickly move laterally in bag drills. Branch also looked athletic when run through a battery of linebacker drills. He got depth on pass drops and showed the ability to run fast laterally as well as in a straight line.
    Fletcher Cox, Mississippi State: Cox turned in a terrific workout as advertised. He tipped the scales at 298, pounds, then ran a 40 time that some stopwatches clocked at 4.78 seconds. During position drills Cox looked very athletic displaying balance and movement skills as he easily changed direction. Scouts were impressed by his ability to keep his knees bent and practice with good pad level. Expect the Mississippi State junior to charge into the top half of round one after his performance today.
    Tyrone Crawford, Boise State: Crawford could be the sleeper at the defensive line position. He clocked 4.85 seconds in the 40 at 275 pounds, more impressively posting a 1.65 10-yard split on his initial try. Crawford was fluid and natural in all his movement skills and looked very good in position drills. He showed terrific hand punch in bag drills and his 28 bench press reps was better than expected. Look for Crawford to be selected before the second day of the draft ends.
    Mike Martin, Michigan: The former Wolverine looked good in every aspect of his combine workout. Martin started off by completing 36 reps on the bench press, then posted surprisingly quick 40 times in the low- to mid-4.8-second area. During drills he moved well, bending his knees and easily changing direction. Martin has established himself as a top-75 selection in April's draft.
    Sliders

    Devon Still, Penn State: Still struggled throughout his entire workout. His 5.05-second 40 time paled when compared to many of the top defensive tackles at the combine. Still looked stiff in drills and struggled with his balance throughout the session.
    Vinny Curry, Marshall: Curry, one of the best pass rushers in the nation the past two years, struggled to run faster than 5.0 seconds in the 40.
    Derrick Shelby, Utah: Shelby is another solid college pass rusher who teams were considering as a multi-purpose defensive end/outside linebacker. His 4.95-second 40 time will raise red flags.


    Read more: http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2012/writers/tony_pauline/02/27/combine.dl/index.html#ixzz1nyLmRwoL
     
  13. FrankRizzo

    FrankRizzo Cheesehead

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    The linebackers who took the field Monday afternoon at Lucas Oil Stadium were incredibly athletic and impressed NFL decision-makers with their speed. Many came across as three-down defenders, which will please NFL coaches even more. Not everyone impressed equally, however. Here's a look at the risers and sliders.
    Risers

    Mychal Kendricks, California: Melvin Ingram's workout with the defensive linemen was one for the ages, and Kendricks' showing with the linebackers wasn't far behind. The Pac-12 defensive player of the year led the linebackers in almost every testing category: His 40 time of 4.45 seconds was the fastest, his vertical jump of 39.5 inches the highest and broad jump of 10-feet, 7-inches the longest. Kendricks carried his momentum through the drill session, looking quick and explosive in every task. Kendricks' sub-6-foot height means he won't be a player for everyone, but a creative defensive coordinator will turn him into a productive pro.
    Luke Kuechly, Boston College: Questions about Kuechly's speed and athleticism preceded the combine. He answered his critics in dynamic fashion, running both of his 40s in the mid 4.5-second range. His vertical jump of 38-inches and broad jump of 10-feet, 3-inches graded among the better marks from today's linebackers. He was smooth opening his hips in coverage drills and was able to get great depth on pass drops. Kuechly did not display a smooth change of direction and some will question his pursuit skills, but on the whole it was a great performance by the Boston College junior.
    Najee Goode, West Virginia: Goode also surpassed expectations. He clocked below 4.7 seconds in the 40, looked fluid during drills, easily changed direction and lost no momentum when required to immediately alter his angle of attack. He was quick-footed in reverse and covered a lot of area. Considered a free-agent prospect entering the season, Goode has moved into the middle rounds of the draft.
    Shea McClellin, Boise State: McClellin worked out with the defensive linemen, but looked every part linebacker at the combine. His 40 times registered as fast as 4.65 seconds and McClellin practiced at that speed during drills. He displayed terrific balance and rhythm during defensive line drills; when used in coverage at linebacker, he looked quick-footed and capable of going sideline-to-sideline. The former college defensive end had a lot to gain from his workout and some teams feel he did enough to move into the top half of Round 2.
    Ronnell Lewis, Oklahoma: Lewis also took part in the defensive line workout, but stood out during linebacker drills. He tested well, running below 4.7 seconds in the 40 and completing 36 reps on the bench. He worked hard in the drill session, easily moving about the field and displaying the ability to immediately change direction. He also showed tremendous hand punch in bag drills.
    Demario Davis, Arkansas State: Davis looked like the complete package, testing well and appearing very athletic during position drills. He timed 4.58 in the 40, touched 38.5 inches in the vertical jump, 10-feet, four-inches in the broad jump and completed 32 reps on the bench. Later in the workout Davis showed good speed and quickness moving in every direction as well as solid ball skills in coverage drills. He's a bit of an unknown outside the scouting world, but don't be surprised if Davis pops into the late part of Round 3.
    Bruce Irvin, West Virginia: Irvin disappointed scouts as a senior, but got his draft momentum going in the right direction today. The athletic linebacker was fast in the 40, timing below 4.5 seconds in both runs. He looked quick in all the drills and displayed solid movement skills with the ability to cover a great deal of area on the field.
    James-Michael Johnson, Nevada: Johnson turned in a complete workout today and was effective on all fronts. He started with 40 times in the mid 4.6-second range. His marks of 37 inches in the vertical jump and 10-feet, 4-inches in the broad jump were also impressive. During drills Johnson looked every bit as athletic as his testing numbers indicate and moved swiftly across the field. He appears to be a complete linebacker who can defend the run or pass in the NFL.
    Zach Brown, North Carolina: Brown was quick in the 40, timing as fast as 4.45 seconds on a number of watches after tipping the scales at 244 pounds. He flashed ability during drills, but seemed stiff and off balance at times. Despite that, the size/speed ratio and his game film make Brown a Top 25 choice.
    Ryan Baker, LSU: It's tough to claim a linebacker who struggled to run 4.85 seconds in the 40 improved his draft grade, but that's what Baker did. Forty aside, he looked athletic and efficient in drills and was often applauded by coaches on the field.
    Sliders

    Vontaze Burfict, Arizona State: The downward spiral continues for Burfict. He did not break 5 seconds in the 40, posted some of the worst vertical and broad jumps from the linebacker group and did not participate in position drills. Entering the season Burfict was considered a top 10 talent, but he's since fallen into the last day of the draft.
    Brandon Lindsay, Pittsburgh: Lindsay is another player who's watching his draft grade plummet. His 40 time of 4.90 seconds was slow even for the defensive line group with which he worked. Lindsay looked somewhat effective in drills, but he may be a player without an NFL position.


    Read more: http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2012/writers/tony_pauline/02/27/combine-linebackers/index.html#ixzz1nyMSk9p2
     

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