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Questions about Marshawn Lynch???

Discussion in 'Packer Fan Forum' started by Pack93z, Apr 12, 2007.

  1. Pack93z

    Pack93z You retired too? .... Not me. I'm in my prime

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    Here is an article detailing the incident with Marshawn Lynch and shows the lengths that he took to face the facts and explain them. To me that shows a hell of a lot of character and maturity.


    http://www.cstv.com/sports/m-footbl/stories/030707aac.html

    Marshawn Lynch went the extra mile to make sure there was no misunderstanding.

    After being accused of sexually assaulting his former girlfriend and being exonerated of all charges by the Alameda (Calif.) County deputy district attorney in January, the former Cal running back sent out a letter to every NFL team swearing to them he was a good guy.

    And then he came to the NFL Combine in Indianapolis a few weeks ago, saying he would have nothing to hide when he met with teams during the 15-minute interview sessions.

    He was intent on reassuring them he wasn't bringing any baggage to the next level, wanted to tell them how he wasn't a bad guy, how he got caught up in a bad situation, how the charges were a total fabrication on the accuser's part. Lynch said he was simply going to "Tell them the truth."

    That was smart thinking on his part because if he wasn't telling the truth, the NFL and its 32 teams would be sure to find out just what kind of person Lynch really is and expose any skeletons lurking in his closet.

    In a world where the Tank Johnsons, Pacman Joneses and Cincinnati Bengals are making headlines for all the wrong reasons and creating a public relations nightmare for the NFL, never has more importance been placed on background checks than has been the case with this year's draft class. The league is spending more time, energy and resources than ever before on them. Athleticism and talent can take you places, but if you're going to be a problem-child and create nothing but headaches and police-blotter headlines, NFL teams want nothing to do with you.

    "It's very important. We spend a lot of time (researching backgrounds)," Chicago Bears head coach Lovie Smith said. "We try to research as much as we possibly can."

    The Bears and other teams are going to greater lengths to find out the kind of character they're dealing with on prospective draft picks. There are the extensive personal interviews where no question is off limits. If there's a criminal history it'll be brought up and an explanation demanded. There are psychological and mental examinations some teams put their targeted players through. And then there are the interviews with players' former coaches, teachers and confidants.

    "We go to their high school to find out as much as we can about their background," Smith said.

    Every rock is overturned, all the facts double-checked. Nothing is out of bounds.

    "We look in hard. I think a lot of teams do," Jacksonville head coach Jack Del Rio said. "I know the emphasis for this league is to put together a good product and have people represent the league well. I think for the most part, we do that. "

    But perception is often different from reality, especially with Johnson's arrests on gun charges, Jones' numerous run-ins with the law - most notably his involvement in a Las Vegas strip club shooting during NBA All-Star weekend - and nine Bengals having been arrested since Jan. 1, 2006. Those few players are giving the league a bad name, but Del Rio is quick to insist that not every player is a bad egg.

    "I think if you look at us compared to a cross-section of society, there are a lot of young men in the league who are out visiting hospitals, donating money to charity and doing great things that are unusual and are special," Del Rio said.

    But those high-profile off-the-field cases that are not so special are beating up the league's image and causing the NFL's future players to come under greater personal scrutiny.

    "You spend more time researching the background, the character background," Del Rio said. "You make sure your checklist is complete with all the things you're looking for with the player."

    More and more, teams talk about how important a player's character is and how they fit into the locker room. They want a player who is going to be a positive influence, not only as a member of the team, but also as part of the community.

    "We tend to focus on that and look for guys who can contribute to a better Jacksonville," Del Rio said.

    "We want a certain type of guy. Character is important to us," Smith said. "We want guys that are going to fit into what we do."

    The NFL even has its own investigative wing - NFL Security - that conducts professional background checks of every prospective player. It's all part of the process now, especially considering the amount of money the top draft picks can expect to take home in signing bonuses. Teams want to make sure they're buying a stock that's stable and going to give them a considerable return on their investment.

    "The fact that the money's grown (is a part of it), but I think it goes deeper," Del Rio said. "I think when you determine character, when you're trying to build a football team, you want guys who you're going to be able to rely on."

    Trust and reliability are two of the biggest characteristics NFL teams want out of this year's draftees. You'll hear just about every coach and GM discuss how if a guy isn't dependable they'd just as soon work with someone else, no matter the talent. Let him be someone else's problem, is their attitude. And if a player has any sort of history of being unreliable, it's a huge red flag.

    "Many times the guys that show up socially having trouble being accountable, being reliable, trustworthy are the same guys that have problems doing their job for the team," Del Rio said.

    So Ramonce Taylor, the former Texas running back who faced felony drug charges along with academic issues while at Texas before transferring to Texas College and not playing a game last fall, is going to have a tough time convincing teams to pick him in the draft, even though he possesses unquestionable talent.

    Some scouts had him projected his as a potential first- or second-round draft pick if he had stayed out of trouble and stayed on the field with the Longhorns. But he didn't, and now he has to convince teams he's worth a gamble.

    Lynch, on the other hand, isn't a gamble. The dropping of charges was a huge relief for the projected first-round pick, and provided proof of his character. But he made sure he was prepared for the rounds of interrogation he'd be facing, even if he had put the unfortunate episode behind him.

    "It's probably not fair, but it's something they want to know and I have nothing to hide," Lynch said.

    No player in this year's draft class has anything to hide because no matter how hard they try - no matter the indiscretion or question of character - any skeletons lurking in the background will be addressed. The NFL might as well be the FBI. They know this draft class, inside and out.
     
  2. sbp_387

    sbp_387 Cheesehead

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    Thier is something about this guy I can't put my finger on it but I dont think he is going to be a good fit in greenbay. I could be worng, but just a feeling.
     
  3. pyledriver80

    pyledriver80 Cheesehead

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    I agree completely. For some reason this guy just screams BUST to me. I want to compare him to William Green
     
  4. Pack93z

    Pack93z You retired too? .... Not me. I'm in my prime

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    Is there something specific that you guys see that I am missing?

    My questions on him here is Green Bay, is that he has lived and played ball in southern California and will he be able to make the transition not only to the weather, but the culture of Green Bay. As others pointed out there is the fact that he hasn't carried the rock in a game with a high number of carries.

    But on the flip side, he was nicked up last year and still played well and gutted it out in many games. They corrected his ankle issues with Vick's shoes and the back from what I have read was more muscular than anything else.

    I hope that the scouting staff in GB has got this figured out, if their is a better fit, I am all for it. But I like how Lynch plays the game.
     
  5. pyledriver80

    pyledriver80 Cheesehead

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    I just don't think he's a good pick at 16 and I think there are other backs who fit our system better.


    Personally he's to much of a dancer for me and I don't like his speed.
     
  6. porky88

    porky88 Cheesehead

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    You don't like mid 4.4 speed? Can I ask where are you getting this "dancing" from? Everything I've seen shows he is a downhill runner with outstanding cutback ability.
     
  7. pyledriver80

    pyledriver80 Cheesehead

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    I've watched him play. He dances to much at times and he does not seem to have that extra gear. To much stopping and going and not enough pure speed. Toss in a bad back, character issues and I don't think he's a good pick at 16.
     
  8. pyledriver80

    pyledriver80 Cheesehead

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    Lynch was accused of sexually and domestically assaulting his ex-girlfriend in December. He was in the line of fire during a drive-by shooting in college. Of those who did the drill, Lynch's short shuttle at the Combine was markedly slower than every runner on this list. Despite an "official" 4.46, his forties were both in the 4.5s according to both Scout.com and the NFL Network. He was timed as slow as 4.55. Lynch struggled with nagging injuries at Cal and the latest word in league circles is that he has a bad back.

    Lynch is quick and agile, but he does not possess awe-inspiring speed.
    Since he has such great field vision, Lynch can try to do too much when he carries the ball. Having the ability to make sweeping cutbacks is a plus, but at times, it can also be a detriment. When a running play inside the tackles is designed to generate a three- or four-yard gain, cutting back and bouncing to the outside can lead to loss of yardage.

    Lynch tries to create a big play too often, cutting to the outside when the better and smarter run is between the tackles. He doesn't stay with lead or pull blockers very well at all, and needs to show a higher degree of patience on many plays. His blocking leaves quite a bit to be desired, as he seems to display very little effort in that phase of his game. He's also had some lingering and recurring hand and arm injuries, which could lead to ball-handling problems if they keep up.


    Not an explosive runner around the corner, but shows very good patience waiting for blocks to develop … Has good body lean, but sometimes gets too high in his stance when attempting to race into the second level, failing to sidestep low blocks in the process … Can be tripped up when he gets tall in his stance, as he does not always protect his feet … Knows how to get skinny through tight creases, but needs to improve his leg drive, as he is not the type of running who can move the pile … Will sometimes get too fancy and execute multiple moves (see 2006 Washington State, Washington and UCLA games), allowing the defender to recover … Needs to distribute the ball better to keep it away from the defenders (see 2006 Minnesota and Stanford games and 2005 Sacramento State and Oregon State) to prevent costly fumbles … Protects the ball better running through traffic than when bouncing outside, but also struggled some when handling a pitch or toss.
     
  9. Pack93z

    Pack93z You retired too? .... Not me. I'm in my prime

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    Here is what some noted people have to say about Lynch..

    http://calbears.cstv.com/sports/marshawn/marshawn-quotes.html

    What They're Saying About Marshawn Lynch...
    "Marshawn is a tremendous all-around football player. He may be the best all-around player that I have ever seen. He can throw it; he can catch it; he can run with it; he can block; he has the size, the strength and the speed. He's got all the tools to be a great back and he continues to mature. He has become more physical. He is a game-breaker; he can make the difference in a game."
    - Jeff Tedford, Cal Head Coach

    "When he's on the field, that's his stage. That's when he lets everything out, right there. I guess football is his medicine, the way for him to release everything, and do his thing. It's kind of neat the way it comes out."
    - Robert Jordan, Cal wide receiver and Lynch's cousin

    "Lynch is an extraordinary player. It has been cool to watch the guy grow up. He's gotten stronger and more creative. He can catch the ball like crazy. He must be a terrific competitor."
    - Pete Carroll, USC Head Coach

    "He is as good a running back as I've seen since I've been a (college) head coach. I've not seen (Oklahoma's) Adrian Peterson in person, but I've seen Marshawn, and he's an impressive player. He ranks with some of the best who have played in this league."
    - Mike Riley, Oregon State Head Coach

    "He can break tackles; you have to do a great job pursuing him. He can make guys miss tackles and can break them. He has a rare combination of speed and power. He can go all the way on every play. You got to get a lot of guys around there and contain him...Lynch is capable of 2,000 yards."
    - Dirk Koetter, Arizona State Head Coach

    "And the thing is, it took four or five people to take him down. I looked at the rest of the film (from 2005) and it was the same thing: he's breaking tackles. I can't think of one time when one guy was able to take him down."
    - Dominic Jones, Minnesota safety

    "Marshawn Lynch is one of the best backs if not the best back in the country. He runs tough, but he can run away from you, catch the ball out of the backfield, and block well. Just a fabulous player."
    - Phillip Fulmer, Tennessee Head Coach

    "Has the speed to run away and, at 217 pounds, the power to run over -- now he just needs to add the carries to make sure you notice him. Lynch has averaged a whopping 7.0 yards per carry his first two years of college football, plus he's a solid receiver, returns kickoffs and even threw a touchdown pass last year."
    - Pat Forde, ESPN.com

    "That dude is unbelievable. He's one of the most diverse running backs I've ever seen. Anytime he gets the ball in his hands he can do anything. We could be on the one-yard line and he could take it all the way. Just having the ball in his hands you never know what he's going to do."
    - DeSean Jackson, Cal wide receiver on SI.com

    "That's what makes it so fun to block for Marshawn. He always gives us credit, even after he's been the one making us look good. He makes you want to get down field and keep blocking, because you know he'll break some tackles. But you'll never hear him talking about himself."
    - Erik Robertson, Cal offensive lineman

    "The thing about him is that he's the best athlete on the field, by a long shot. He can run with it. He can catch it. He can throw it. He can pretty much do it all. We're able to put him in so many positions and he's so smart. One of the things you really have to be careful with asking guys to do too much is you're putting them in all these different positions. They have to understand what they're doing. They have to know the play. They have to know the fundamentals and technique and all the coaching points to it. He is a great learner that way. He really has a great feel for the game. He can get it in the meeting and take it on the field and have a pretty good idea of what we're looking for."
    - Jeff Tedford, Cal head coach

    "[Lynch] Ran for almost 1,300 yards in only 10 games with Cal struggling at quarterback. Imagine what he'll do when he's healthy with a stable signal-caller. Forget USC: Lynch is the best [Heisman] candidate in the Pac-10."
    - Dennis Dodd, CBS Sportsline

    "Lynch has a rare combination of strength, balance and speed. He appears capable of breaking away for a touchdown whether he is running up the middle, taking the ball around the edge or lining up in the slot...His trademark is his ability to stay on his feet. He challenges tacklers, running right at them, and often through them. In the open field, he has true breakaway speed. He can also, when need be, use deft moves to evade tacklers."
    - Bruce Adams, San Francisco Chronicle

    "This kid [Marshawn Lynch] is a legitimate Heisman candidate - Dark Horse is another way of saying he plays on the West Coast and no one sees him play. Well, if that's the case, you're missing out. Had Lynch been healthy throughout the 2005 season, 1,500 yards in an 11-game season would've been a distinct possibility. Lynch might be the most complete running back anywhere not including, arguably, Norman, Oklahoma. That's not blasphemy, Lynch is power, speed, vision and explosion in a 5'11"/225 package that has blasted through defenses for the past two years. After he was hurt last season, people forgot all about Lynch, but he was magnificent the rest of the season. In the final eight games of the year, Lynch rolled up over 1,000 yards on only 167 carries (nearly a 6 yard per carry average) and nine touchdowns. BYU is still trying to tackle him after what he did to them in the Las Vegas Bowl. Although he 'works' on the West Coast, don't forget about #10 in the blue and gold, you'd hate to miss a 'real' Heisman candidate in action in 2006."
    - John Harris, CollegeFootballNews.com

    "[You have] the explosive factor with Marshawn Lynch. His potential to put up huge numbers, especially if Cal can get its QB situation figured out. Lynch, you have to remember, had an injury, missed two games and parts of others and still wound up rushing for almost 1300 yards...Lynch can be an impact player, one of the elite running backs in college football this year."
    - Todd McShay, ESPN

    "Everybody has talent, but not everyone has the gift. Marshawn has the gift."
    - Ron Gould, Cal running backs coach

    "Lynch has the special ability where a clean tackle hits him and it just doesn't factor in."
    - Pete Carroll, USC Head Coach

    "Marshawn's an incredible back. We have to remind ourselves to keep playing, keep blocking, because he's so fun to watch."
    - Marvin Philip, former Cal offensive lineman

    "I feed off Marshawn. I watch him make a big play and then he comes off the field smiling. It's exciting. And once he comes off, he tries to help me, telling me what he saw."
    - Cal running back Justin Forsett

    "Marshawn Lynch's 55-yard touchdown run against Stanford combined pieces of O.J. Simpson, Gale Sayers and Walter Payton. Watch out, Adrian Peterson."
    - Dave Newhouse, Oakland Tribune

    "He makes the O-line look good. He's the offensive line's best friend ... He's a very, very humble person."
    - Marvin Philip, former Cal offensive lineman

    "It should say how much is expected out of Lynch that he had a slightly disappointing season and still cranked out 1,246 yards, ten touchdowns and averaged 6.4 yards per carry despite missing time and having a few problems with a hand injury. He's a home run threat every time he touches the ball with the size at 223 pounds to power for tough yards. If he can stay healthy he's a legitimate Heisman candidate and a legitimate threat to crank out 2,000 yards."
    - CollegeFootballNews.com

    "Marshawn Lynch deserves Heisman consideration from day one."
    - CollegeFootballNews.com

    "He can sprint, he can catch, he can dazzle on returns and he can even throw it."
    - Joe Davidson, Sacramento Bee

    "He doesn't go down; he doesn't give up. He doesn't believe anybody can tackle him. You've got to gang-tackle him and you've got to hang on."
    - Mike Bellotti, Oregon Head Coach

    "He's scary. I don't know if one guy can tackle him."
    - Mike Riley, Oregon State Head Coach
     
  10. sbp_387

    sbp_387 Cheesehead

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    it's 4.51 40 time according to scout.com
     

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