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OFFICIAL 2007 DRAFT PACK REVIEWS & PREDICTIONS

Discussion in 'Packer Fan Forum' started by TOPHAT, Apr 29, 2007.

  1. TOPHAT

    TOPHAT Cheesehead

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    DRAFT REVIEWS

    There are some angry bloggers out there - but not everyone is upset:

    Green Bay Railbird Central is cutting Ted Thompson some slack. "Everyone just has to trust that Ted Thompson knows more than super fan Dave from Medford, Wisconsin. Fans have no choice. I don't think Thompson's feelings were hurt when everyone booed him at the draft party yesterday. He gets paid the big bucks for a reason. It was a joke when Thompson was booed. Give Justin Harrell a chance. If Harrell is a bust, Thompson gets fired. If Harrell is a Pro Bowler, nothing will happen to the fan who booed. They can act like a child and boo before Harrell even plays a down. And in the event Harrell plays great, they can pretend like nothing happened." The site seems somewhat enthusiastic about most of the picks, saying the running backs fit well with the team's zone-blocking scheme and mentioning guys who should help the special teams.
    PACKERwatch gives thoughts on each Day 2 pick, saying David Clowney is his favorite choice of the draft. He wraps it up with "In conclusion, the Packers probably appeased angry fans with some less risky and smarter picks on Day 2. Some of these guys could end up being good."
    The Free Badger doesn't seem upset, but is also tempering his enthusiasm, writing "Overall, day two was better than day one. But then again day two picks don't have the potential to make the impact that the early rounds do. My hope is that Ted Thompson proves me wrong in the long run and hopefully makes a couple of medium to big sized moves before the season starts to shore up some needs, particularly at the TE position."
    OK, so not everyone is happy. In the blog Forward Thoughts, Brian Hancock sums up his feelings with a simple "Blah!" ... and later a "Double Blah!"
    Matthew Lowerr in the blog Agrestic doesn't hide his disdain, labeling his post Fire Ted Thompson. Writes Lowerr: "The Packers need help at almost every position and nothing was done to make the team much better than 8-8 in the coming season over draft weekend. (Not to mention a painfully quiet free agency season.)"

    ____________________________________________________________________________________

    Upset at the Packers' draft? Here's reason for hope:

    The grades for the Packers haven't been stellar so far. But NFL.com's Gil Brandt offers this for fans of any team upset with the picks of their team: "Last year, Buffalo was given an F, but it turned out to be one of the best. Fans, if you're down on your team's draft, don't be worried. Teams' drafts tend to turn out better than the so-called experts think they might be."
     
  2. TOPHAT

    TOPHAT Cheesehead

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    Re: DRAFT REVIEWS

    :feedback: :feedback: :feedback:
     
  3. TOPHAT

    TOPHAT Cheesehead

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    DRAFT REVIEW

    http://packerama.blogspot.com/2007/04/one-round-to-go.html

    A former sports editor and Packer beat writer for a now-defunct Green Bay newspaper, a lonely blogger says, "Random thoughts on the picks":

    -(1 DT Justin Harrell) Harrell seems like a tough guy, but that was one big question mark to pick with an opening-round choice.

    -(2 RB Brandon Jackson) I just don't know - it's hard to think of a Nebraska back who's really dominant. They've usually just followed those big linemen that grow on trees down there.

    -(3 WR James Jones) An All-WAC Second Teamer? Wow. If that's the best you can do, you might consider drafting Ohio State's Troy Smith at this point and see if he can beat out Ingle Martin as the No. 3 QB.

    -(3B S Aaron Rouse) Well, he won a leadership award and is apparently a good tackler. This is the closest they've come to drafting somebody in an appropriate spot.

    -(4 T/G Allen Barbre) Another reach, although this guy is worth a look-see: a fast 300-pounder (he used to run down as the end man on kicks). This might be the most interesting guy here.

    -(5A WR David Clowney) A speedy receiver who has done well at Virginia Tech. Two VT players in the same draft?

    -(6A LB Korey Hall). Your typical undersized LB. And still no tight end pick.

    -(6B LB Desmond Bishop) And yet another linebacker. You have to wonder if somebody there can't make up their mind.

    -(6C K Mason Crosby) Apparaently someone there thought he wouldn't survive to free agency; it's good to get competition for Rayner, but there are bigger needs.

    It's Favre's final season. Well, now that Randy Moss seems headed for New England, we can assume Favre won't be coming back after this year. In fact, if he had less class, he'd probably hand in his retirement now.

    He got little help yesterday from a front office that is willing to work with injured projects rather than get the immediate help that would have made Favre happy with his decision to return.

    Favre won't go back on his decision - but he has to know now that the Packers are building, however poorly, for the future, and not for another playoff run this year. That doesn't mean they won't make the playoffs - they almost did last year with a bad team - but if so, it will be despite their roster, not because of it.


    TOP HAT'S FOOTNOTE: WOW, BLOGGERS AND MANY FORUMS ARE LONELY SITES.
     
  4. TOPHAT

    TOPHAT Cheesehead

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    POSTDRAFT DAY REVIEW

    http://www.jsonline.com/story/index.aspx?id=598535

    Thompson stays true to conservative ways

    There were several options available to Green Bay Packers general manager Ted Thompson over the weekend that might have upgraded his roster significantly.....Any one of the four would have been a bold move - a gamble, one might say - given the circumstances. The potential for failure was no small matter. But Thompson stood pat, choosing to stick to his conservative plan of building almost solely through the draft and forgoing any of the risks his mentor Ron Wolf made while building the franchise into a Super Bowl contender in the 1990s.
    And now after three drafts, Thompson's neck would appear to be on the line. His offense arguably isn't any better than it was a year ago and he's potentially a year away from losing the one constant that gives the team hope each season: quarterback Brett Favre. "What we try to do is everything in our power to try to help make this team as good as it can be," Thompson said Sunday shortly after selecting his 11th and final player of the 2007 draft. "You have to take a lot of things into consideration.
    "Sometimes it's an aggressive move; sometimes that aggressive move is not the appropriate time. But you just keep doing everything you can to make the team better. And that's all you can do." But has Thompson done all he can do? It's possible his plan to build through the draft will finally show some progress this year with young players pushing up through ranks to raise the overall level of play. But after losing running back Ahman Green and tight end David Martin in free agency, and failing to add a single free agent on offense, Thompson did nothing dynamic in the draft.
    In the first round, he sat and watched as Buffalo stole Lynch four spots ahead of him; then sat and watched as Minnesota jumped over him two spots in the second round to take South Carolina receiver Sydney Rice. Carolina then snapped up Southern California receiver Dwayne Jarrett on the next selection, leaving the Packers no choice but to trade down. Thompson, who was booed by Packers fans for his decision to draft defensive tackle Justin Harrell with his first pick, didn't see any need to move up in the draft to secure a player he wanted, although he said he did try to move forward in the first round to no avail. In both cases, he probably could have overpaid to get what he wanted, but standing pat was more in his nature.
    "I am disappointed, not speaking about anything specifically," Thompson said. "I am disappointed on a couple of things that we were working on that didn't work out." Among those things might have been the acquisition of Moss, the temperamental wide receiver who was dealt to New England for a fourth-round pick. The Packers were in the running for Moss' services, but it appears Moss was more interested in playing for an established winner than taking his chances with the Packers. ESPN reported that Moss was willing to restructure his contract only for the Patriots, and that any other team would have had to pay him his full $9.75 million this year. In a conference call with New England writers, Moss said that wasn't necessarily true but he made it clear the Patriots had more to offer. "How many players can you ask in the league that wouldn't want to come up here and play for the New England Patriots?" Moss said.
    Asked if he could have done more to get Moss to come to Green Bay, Thompson refused to discuss anything about the Packers' attempt to complete such a deal. If Moss was unwilling to restructure his contract for Green Bay, Thompson wasn't saying. He also wasn't saying whether agreeing to pay Moss the $9.75 million would have landed him the veteran receiver. Choosing not to take a chance with Moss, Jackson, Turner or anyone else, Thompson added on offense Nebraska running back Brandon Jackson in the second round, receiver James Jones in the third, offensive lineman Allen Barbre in the fourth, receiver David Clowney in the fifth, fullback Korey Hall in the sixth, running back DeShawn Wynn in the seventh and tight end Clark Harris in the seventh.
    In assessing where this draft and others left his offense, which in the past two years has lost Green, Martin and receiver Javon Walker, he chose to look at the full picture instead of a single face. "As a team, the best way and the most consistent way to get better is from within," Thompson said. "I think our own guys have to keep trying to get better, I have to get better, our staff and that sort of thing. I think we have a chance. I think we have a pretty decent group of guys here." If that's the case, it should start to show this season. It probably needs to for Thompson's sake.
     
  5. pyledriver80

    pyledriver80 Cheesehead

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    Re: DRAFT REVIEW


    This is very accurate and seems to be the consensus on the Packers draft.
     
  6. TOPHAT

    TOPHAT Cheesehead

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    PACKER SITE DRAFT REVIEW

    http://www.packersnews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070430/PKR07/704300517/1989

    Mike Vandermause column: Play-it-safe Thompson holds back the Packers. By Mike Vandermause

    The Green Bay Packers were the big losers Sunday in the Randy Moss sweepstakes. A Moss trade to Green Bay has been rumored for most of the offseason, but the Packers couldn't close the deal. They weren't aggressive enough in attempting to land a desperately needed offensive playmaker, and it will come back to haunt them. Somewhere in Mississippi, quarterback Brett Favre must be frowning. Instead of adding a proven Pro Bowl receiver, the Packers' idea of helping Favre over the weekend was to draft a pair of unproven wideouts who will be hard-pressed to make an immediate impact. The New England Patriots were the big winners in the Moss derby. They secured Moss' services for the bargain-basement price of a fourth-round draft choice and a reported $3 million in compensation in 2007.
    Ted Thompson, the Packers' general manager, has taken a measured, cautious approach to building the roster. There are benefits to that philosophy, in which Thompson leans heavily on the draft and accumulating extra picks, mixes in occasional free-agent signings, and focuses on retaining solid players on the roster. But there's a significant flaw in Thompson's strategy. At some point, a team has to be willing to take a risk, and Thompson seems unable or unwilling to do that. The safe way is not always the best way.
    Former Packers GM Ron Wolf was a master at throwing caution to the wind. In 1992, he traded a first-round draft choice for Favre, who was a third-string quarterback. In 1993, he handed over a boatload of money to sign free-agent Reggie White. In 1995, he traded a second-round pick for tight end Keith Jackson. Those were key moves that helped build a Super Bowl championship team. That go-for-the-throat mentality appears to be lacking in Thompson, who seems too willing to allow other teams to force the action and dictate terms. His passive approach has left the Packers without a go-to running back. Thompson was outbid by the Houston Texans for free-agent Ahman Green during the offseason, and he wasn't willing to move up in the first round to select a premier back. In fact, Thompson never has traded up in the draft.
    Besides an untested backfield, Favre will be forced to live with one bona fide star receiver — Donald Driver — and a collection of players high on potential and low on experience. Thompson would do well to heed the advice of Wolf, who last week offered his philosophy on targeting certain players, either in the draft or on the trade market. "The bottom line was, if you really wanted a guy, go get the guy," Wolf said. "So what if you gave too much? You would try to make that up some other way. The key was, make sure you got the guy you wanted to get."
    The Packers failed to get Moss, a player Favre would have welcomed with open arms. The result is the Packers, who ranked a lowly 22nd in points scored last season, likely will continue to struggle on offense. Asked Sunday if he needs to be more aggressive for the Packers to reach the next level, Thompson replied: "What we try to do is everything in our power … to help to make this team as good as it can be." Thompson needs to venture outside his comfort zone and try harder. Only then will the Packers be as good as they can be.
     
  7. TOPHAT

    TOPHAT Cheesehead

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    OFFICIAL GRADE 2007 PACK DRAFT

    HUGE PACK NATION POLL ON ANOTHER SITE SAYS:

    A 3%

    B 16%

    C 30%

    D 24%

    F 27%

    ESSENTIALLY, 81% OF FANS THINK OUR DRAFT WAS A C OR WORSE.
     
  8. Arles

    Arles Cheesehead

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    OFFICIAL GRADE 2007 PACK DRAFT

    Makes sense. The fans general sense will be a direct reflection of what the media says.
     
  9. MassPackersFan

    MassPackersFan Cheesehead

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    Re: DRAFT REVIEW

    I stopped reading there. If he doesn't know that Nebraska had a very mediocre O-line in 2006 then he didn't scout Brandon Jackson, a second round pick. I don't see him scouting any players lower than that either.
     
  10. TOPHAT

    TOPHAT Cheesehead

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    DRAFT REVIEW

    http://www.madison.com/tct/sports/packers/index.php?ntid=131644&ntpid=2

    Mike Lucas: Looking for inspiration from Thompson, Packers? Sorry

    There was an uninspiring exchange last week between the uninspiring Ted Thompson and the media corps, always on the lookout to document any semblance of inspiration from the uninspiring Green Bay general manager. During an uninspiring news conference, leading up to what turned out to be an uninspiring draft for the Packers, there was this uninspiring concession on the urgency to upgrade an uninspiring stable of running backs. "We don't feel particularly bound to do anything at that position," said Thompson, who has been anything but a source of inspiration. And you thought Mike Sherman was uninspiring?
    Thompson may know what he's doing, but you'd like a little bit more proof. Especially since the Packers would seem to be treading water with Brett Favre, who not so long ago -- April 2006 -- was holding a non-news debriefing on the Cottonwoods Golf Course in Tunica, Miss., and wondering what the big fuss was all about regarding his future plans. Favre really didn't have any news or anything to say about his commitment, or lack thereof, to playing another season. Ted Thompson, Green Bay Packers executive vice president, general manager and director of football operations, talks about the Packers first round selection in the National Football League draft Saturday in Green Bay, Wis. The Packers picked Justin Harrel, a defensive tackle from Tennessee, with the 16th overall pick.
    But he made it clear that he felt the Packers needed to be aggressive in their attempts to improve the product, like they were under former general manager Ron Wolf. Was Favre crying wolf at the time? Or was he serious when he invoked the free agent signing memory of Reggie White and implored Thompson and the Packers to "make a statement again. You have to stay up with the NFL, and teams are making statements. Sometimes you hit on them and sometimes you don't. I think we have to do that." Think again, unless the uninspiring Frank Walker, a free agent cornerback not to be confused with Cordell Walker (Texas Ranger), qualifies as "making a statement" to your thinking. Consider the irony of the non-aggressive Thompson signing Walker, who was accused of being too aggressive by Tom Coughlin, his former coach with the New York Giants. Also consider the irony of Thompson taking a quarterback in the 2005 draft -- the plummeting and totally uninspiring Aaron Rodgers -- when he would have been in a position to grab another plummeting quarterback (Notre Dame diva Brady Quinn) with maybe a higher value in the 2007 draft.
    Thompson's increasingly annoying mantra ("We don't draft based on needs, and I know that's boring") is beginning to fall woefully short with a Green Bay fan base that has to be growing more and more skeptical about his decision-making and the direction of this franchise. Not that Thompson should be in the business of appeasing the fans. Or outsiders. But what kind of message is Thompson sending his own players, particularly his older players like Favre, with his lack of urgency in addressing needs? When Thompson was asked last Monday about the prospect of signing free agents after the draft, he said, "We don't have any definite plans about doing anything."
    Now that's inspiring. In his defense, he did qualify the remark by also noting, "If you have some flexibility, which we try to keep, then sometimes you can act upon those opportunities." Or, sometimes, you just act too late. And that seems to sum up Thompson. For example, New York Jets general manager Mike Tannenbaum moved up in the first round of the draft to select Pitt cornerback Darrelle Revis and then moved up again in the second round to take Michigan linebacker David Harris. The latter move was executed with the help of Thompson, who traded that No. 47 pick (Harris) and the 235th overall to the Jets for No. 63, No. 89 and No. 191. So while Tannebaum was aggressively filling needs with Revis and Harris -- "To get those two players, we were willing to pay the price," Tannenbaum told the New York press -- Thompson was "adding core value" to the Packers. Mind you, instead of moving up to ensure themselves a shot at Cal running back Marshawn Lynch, they settled for the No. 16 pick and Tennessee's Justin Harrell, an injury-prone defensive tackle. When Thompson was pressed on whether he could have possibly moved down and still gotten Harrell, he said, "We had calls from I think five different teams and none of them was warranted in terms of taking that risk."
    Risk? Wasn't it risky for the Packers to be reaching for Harrell when they did? In retrospect, the risk was in thinking that Thompson knew what he was doing in "soft playing" Randy Moss. Or so it sounded after New England acquired Moss in exchange for a fourth-round draft choice. The transaction was contingent upon Moss reworking his contract, something he may not have been inclined to do for a Green Bay mailing address. Nonetheless, even the most passionate Moss-haters would have to feel like they had been "mooned" again, a statement on their own uninspiring GM.
     
  11. gopackgo

    gopackgo Cheesehead

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    Re: OFFICIAL GRADE 2007 PACK DRAFT

    That is about as reliable as the Coaches assesement poll on ESPN. If we win, McCarthy is great, if we lose, he sucks.
     
  12. TOPHAT

    TOPHAT Cheesehead

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    DIVISION REVIEW

    http://story.scout.com/a.z?s=61&p=2&c=640384

    Division foes a step ahead of Packers. Detroit, Minnesota and Chicago load up on offense through draft. By T. Dunne

    NFL Draft weekend was designed to take Green Bay’s offense to the next level. The 16th overall pick guaranteed an instant starter at running back, wide receiver, or tight end and the Randy Moss rumors were swirling again. For once, the Packers would splurge all of their top picks on weapons for Brett Favre. Instead of seizing an opportunity to substantially elevate Green Bay’s offensive firepower above their division rivals, general manager Ted Thompson once again strayed from conventionality.
    It’s Thompson’s draft board. Not Favre’s. Not the fans. While Green Bay was stuck in Thompson’s agenda in the first round, Detroit, Minnesota and Chicago landed instant playmakers. A healthy Justin Harrell bolsters the defense and Thompson may have found some offensive diamonds in the rough later on. But let’s not kid ourselves. It was a painful first round. Three NFC North teams landed potential cornerstones that will hit the field immediately, while the other drafted a defensive tackle that may not even start.
    It all started at the second overall pick, where Detroit held the key to the draft. Brady Quinn? Joe Thomas? Calvin Johnson? With so many options, Matt Millen just had to find a way to botch another draft, right? Wrong. He swallowed his pride and for the fourth time in his tenure, drafted a wideout in the top ten. Unlike Charles Rogers and Mike Williams, this one’s for real. Undisputed NFL Draft king, Mel Kiper Jr., even declared Johnson a better prospect than Reggie Bush. Facing him twice a year is scary. Say what you want about quarterback Jon Kitna, but the savvy veteran threw for 4,208 yards and 21 touchdowns last year. With Roy Williams (1,310-7), Mike Furrey (1,086-6), and Johnson operating in Mike Martz’s video game offense, the Lions offense could easily become the division’s best.
    Green Bay trading up for Adrian Peterson proved just a dream five picks later. Now in purple and gold, the Oklahoma running back becomes a cheesehead’s nightmare. The Vikings already had Chester Taylor on their roster but realized Peterson was too talented to pass up. Now head coach Brad Childress has arguably the league’s best 1-2 punch in the backfield and they’re running behind Pro Bowl guard Steve Hutchinson and Mount (Bryant) McKinnie. The bleeding didn’t end there.
    Following the bizarre pick of Harrell, Green Bay fans watched helplessly as game-breaking tight end Greg Olsen conveniently fell in the lap of the Chicago Bears. As the defending NFC Champions, Chicago picked second to last. Rarely do teams ever land instant playmakers at this depth - ask Ron Wolf who infamously plucked John Michels, Ross Verba and Antuan Edwards in the glory years. But leave it to agent Drew Rosenhaus … that Packer killer. Olsen, one of Rosenhaus’ clients, provides Rex Grossman a vertical threat down the middle to complement Mushin Muhammad, Bernard Berrian, and Rashied Davis. Nothing helps a struggling young quarterback like a sure-handed tight end safety blanket. Now that Grossman has one, he’s almost guaranteed to improve from a 20-interception season. Without its offense holding them back, who knows how many games Chicago could win next year.
    Sunday turned frustration to utter fury. New England dealt a fourth round pick to Oakland for Randy Moss, leaving the Packers’ entire off-season acquisition list greener than ever. Nebraska running back Brandon Jackson (second round), San Jose State receiver James Jones (third), and Virginia Tech sprinter David Clowney (fifth) will be expected to contribute ASAP. It didn’t take much for the Packers’ offense to reach elite status. A trade here, a pick there, baddaboom … the offense is locked and loaded. After virtually sleeping through free agency, it was assumed that Thompson had something up his sleeve for this weekend. Something to put Green Bay over the top- a trick he’s been plotting for weeks.
    Instead Brett Favre was once again left with a squirt gun as Kitna, Grossman and Tarvaris Jackson were given pistols. Jones and Clowney could evolve into franchise bookend starters, but it’s highly unlikely this year. If anyone doubted that Thompson doesn’t care about Favre’s dwindling window of opportunity, they were reminded of such over the weekend. Now five very raw wide receivers (Greg Jennings, Ruvell Martin, Carlyle Holiday, Jones, Clowney) and a rookie running back (Jackson) are expected to make an impact this fall. An 8-8 team that is on the cusp of the postseason shouldn’t be rebuilding on offense and peaking on defense. An experienced defense should’ve dictated Thompson to pursue veterans for the offense. Instead Green Bay is still a team straddling the line of playoff contention and full-fledged rebuilding. It was assumed Thompson would nudge Green Bay towards the former this past weekend.
    It’s commendable that Thompson isn’t swayed by popular opinion and you can understand his logic. Harrell strengthens Green Bay’s defensive line rotation. His 6-4, 305 lbs. frame will tie up blockers for A.J. Hawk and Nick Barnett to make plays ala Tony Siragusa and Ray Lewis on the 2000 Baltimore Ravens. But is the talent gap between Harrell and Corey Williams greater than the difference between Olsen and Bubba Franks? Hopefully Thompson doesn’t find out the hard way on NBC Sunday Night Football Oct. 7 against the Bears. By then we should also know if Green Bay is a team in transition, or a team in contention. Right now that distinction is more blurry than ever.
     
  13. TOPHAT

    TOPHAT Cheesehead

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    SPORTING NEWS REVIEW

    http://www.sportingnews.com/yourturn/viewtopic.php?t=202062

    Green Bay Packers. DT Justin Harrell was a bit of a reach, but the Packers hit big with RB Brandon Jackson, who should become Ahman Green's long-term replacement. They also grabbed some athletic, competitive players who could start eventually. GRADE: B-

    _____________________________________________________________

    http://www.profootballweekly.com/PFW/NFLDraft/Draft+Day/2007/draftanalysis.htm

    Green Bay: DT Justin Harrell’s stock had steadily been climbing in the postseason, but the Packers very likely could have traded down and still landed him ahead of the Chiefs. Second-rounder Brandon Jackson and seventh-rounder DeShawn Wynn both fit their stretch running game. San Jose State WR James Jones was a reach in the third round. Fifth-rounder David Clowney could have a better chance of contributing than Jones. Landing a placekicker as strong-legged as Mason Crosby in the sixth round could turn out to be a steal. The best thing the Packers may have done, as they tend to do every year, was trade down several times and acquire value in the form of more picks. Missouri Southern OT Allen Barbre fits their zone blocking scheme and could be a versatile backup. Overall, considering how many picks they secured, they tended to increase their chances of hitting on at least three starters. Grade: Good
     
  14. MassPackersFan

    MassPackersFan Cheesehead

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    OFFICIAL GRADE 2007 PACK DRAFT

    Sporting News gives decent breakdowns. We'll see if Harrell was a reach.
     
  15. Arles

    Arles Cheesehead

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    OFFICIAL 2007 PACK DRAFT REVIEW/GRADE

    "game-breaking tight end Greg Olsen" - Scouts, I had hoped for better from you. How does a "game-breaking TE" have only 5-6 plays all season of over 20 yards, an ave of 12 ypc and 1 TD. To put it in perspective, our boy from Rutgers had 7 plays of over 20 yards, ave of 14.5 and 2 TDs. I guess the threshold for "game-breaking" got a little lower this year.
     
  16. TOPHAT

    TOPHAT Cheesehead

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    A TYPICAL PACKER FAN DRAFT REVIEW

    Summary Statement: To a fan, this draft has got to be pretty disappointing. I know I was yelling at the TV this weekend. There was a definite lack of "sizzle". Yes, some positions of need were addressed, but as I look back at the moves the Packers made (or didn't make), I have a look on my face that displays a combination of confusion and smelling rotten milk.

    1) Harrell - Both Harrell and Reggie White wore #92 at Tennessee. Maybe TT was watching old film and the player he thought he was watching was actually Reggie White. I am not going to speculate as to whether or not this pick will pan out - but Harrell was a big reach at #16, in my opinion. Defensive linemen usually are "reaches" because good ones are so valuable. Year after year, teams pick D-Linemen higher than they should, and year after year, there are D-Line busts in the First Round. I guess I could go either way on this pick. On the plus side, the Packers needed an impact player. Just as RB is the easiest position on offense for a rookie to step in and make an impact, I think DL is the equivalent on defense. So on those lines, Harrell SHOULD be able to step in and play immediately. The same might not have held true for Reggie Nelson (my choice), Robert Meachem, or Greg Olsen.
    But on the down side, Harrell was a reach at #16. If the Packers were going to reach, why wouldn't they have reached for a player that played a position that they needed more help at? I know - you "don't draft for need". But if you're going to reach, why not reach for Reggie Nelson or Michael Griffin at Safety? Why not reach for Meachem or Bowe at WR or Olsen at TE? The Packers already have Ryan Pickett, Corey Williams, Cullen Jenkins, Colin Cole, Johnny Jolly, and Kenderick Allen. While no one is going to confuse them for the "Fearsome Foursome" or the "Purple People Eaters", D-Line was hardly a "need" position. And what about Alan Branch? He was projected as a Top-10 pick a couple of weeks ago. Is Harrell really a better choice at DT than Branch? This pick was a real head-scratcher for me.
    2) Brandon Jackson - another head-scratcher. At #47, the Packers had their choice of the "next level" of RBs. Brian Leonard, who some mock drafts had going in the first round, was there. Antonio Pittman (my choice at 2nd-tier RB), Kenny Irons, and Michael Bush (injury issues, but upside) were all there at RB; Eric Wright (character issues) was there at CB; Steve Smith (experienced, good production in good conference) was there at WR. But TT decided to trade out of #47 and missed out on Leonard, Irons, and Wright, and Smith, PASSED on Pittman and Bush, and chose Jackson? ackson is a work in progress. He was a feature back for all of 9 games in his career, he's kind of small, he's not a burner, and he's had injury issues. He may have good feet and good vision - which translates well to a ZBS - but surely, he would have lasted to the third round... wouldn't he? i'm not against picking Jackson as much as I am against picking him over some other guys (Leonard, Smith, Wright, Pittman). This pick has boom-or-bust written all over it, and at #63, I think he was a reach too.
    3a) James Jones - great pick... IN THE 7TH ROUND!! This was the best player on the Packers' draft board? Maybe I'm missing something, but if Randy Moss has a better season in 2007 than James Jones does, I think this pick was awful.
    3b) Aaron Rouse - the next pick in what looks like a boom-or-bust Day 1 for the Packers. One quote I read about Rouse really scared me: looks like Tarzan, plays like Jane. I've coached guys like that. I can't explain it... athletic, hard-working, intelligent enough, but when you put the pads on the kid, he disappears. This kid better be the king of the special teams because this pick could be another stinker. When you look at scouting reports that say "not instinctive in coverage," "does not have good ball skills," and "liability in zone coverage," and you are counting on Kurt Schottenheimer to turn him into a player, special teams may be the only chance Rouse will have to contribute in 2007. Who knows - maybe they plan to move him to Sam LB. That might almost make sense...
    4) Allen Barbre - project. Someone has to play LT when Clifton's knees decide they've had enough. Decent, yet unexciting pick.
    5) David Clowney - The Packers need someone with deep speed to stretch the field. Clowney might be that guy, but not in 2007. I actually could see him develop from skinny track guy into legitimate WR like Donald Driver did. Not a bad pick. Can they turn this guy into a kick returner?
    6a) Korey Hall - yawn... LB who will get a shot at FB. Note to TT: Cory Anderson from Tennessee is a FA. At least he's played FB for a couple of seasons.
    6b) Desmond Bishop - strictly a special teamer in this style of defense.
    6c) Mason Crosby - BY FAR, Crosby is the Packers' draft pick that I am most excited about. That's not saying much, is it? Still, I think Crosby has the best shot at making an impact in 2007. Great value in the sixth round.
    7a) DeShawn Wynn - good measurables, below-average production. Boom-or-bust player worth it in the 7th round.
    7b) Clark Harris - OK... my question is "Why?" Ben Patrick, a Day One pick on just about every mock draft, was still there in the 6th round when the Packers had three picks. Crosby over Patrick in the 6th round? Absolutely. But Hall and Bishop? Come on! Clark Harris is a project. They might have gotten something out of Patrick in 2007.
    Conclusion: The Packers went into this draft with obvious holes at RB, S, WR, TE and CB. I don't see a single pick that makes me think "Ah-ha - this guy will plug that hole," and that is very troubling. Round after round, it seemed TT was too wrapped up in trying to find his "diamonds in the rough" when there were diamonds staring him right in the face. And when even TT says that he starts to place more value in plugging holes on Day 2, his selections don't always make sense. With the 16th pick, the Packers did NOTHING to address their most glaring holes. And if that isn't troubling enough, Picking Harrell had a domino effect on the Packers hole-filling efforts. By Round 2, they had the same holes that they had in Round 1 - but now, the menu of players was less appealing. Consider: Harrell (DT), Jackson (RB), Jones (WR), and Rouse (S), or 1) S - Reggie Nelson or Michael Griffin 2) WR - Steve Smith 3) RB - Michael Bush / Antonio Pittman / Brandon Jackson 4) DT - Marcus Thomas Nelson / Griffin starts at Safety and is a HUGE upgrade over Marquand Manual.
    Smith is in that "next tier" of WRs, stepped up when Dwayne Jarrett missed a few games, played all four years and started 27 games for a pro-style offense, and put up good numbers in 2006 despite playing with an inexperienced QB. I could see him winning the Packers' #3 WR job coming out of training camp. Bush's injury makes him a bit of a gamble, but he could turn into a stud. A featured back on a Big Ten team, Pittman's main knock is his size (5' 10 3/4", 207)? In a ZBS offense, could he be another Warrick Dunn? Compared to Pittman, Brandon Jackson is shorter, slower, and only weighs 210 - and he may very well have still been there in the 3rd round too. Marcus Thomas - 1st Round talent, but with baggage stemming from a failed drug test (marijuana). Still, he's big, strong, quick, and very distuptive at the LOS.
    Trading a 4th round pick for Randy Moss would have been worth doing too. To top it all off, James Jones might still have been there after the draft to sign as a free agent! Like I said, it seemed to me that TT was chasing diamonds in the rough by trading down, rather than selecting the diamonds right in front of his face on Day 1. After last season's draft and FA acquisitions, depth isn't as big of an issue as it was after the 2005 season. This team already had decent depth at several positions, and now would have been a good time to try to add an impact player or two at positions that aren't so deep (i.e. Nelson or Griffin at S, Randy Moss at WR).
    And on Day 2 - when TT himself admitted to placing a greater emphasis on need - he did uncover a possible deep threat. But he also passed on a Day 1 TE (Ben Patrick) in favor of a couple of LBs (one who projects as a FB and one who will most likely only see the field on special teams), he couldn't find another DB worth selecting, and with the selection of Crosby, managed to upgrade a position that wasn't necessarily a glaring weakness.
    This draft may very well end up helping the Packers a great deal - but with so many "sleeper" picks, "boom-or-bust" picks, and "project" picks, that may not happen until 2008 or 2009. The only immediate help I see will come from Justin Harrell and Mason Crosby - and neither of them play "need" positions. This draft was very disappointing for me. Between this draft's lack of sizzle and the Packers' failure to bolster any of their weaker positions via trade or free agency (my apologies to Frank Walker), any optimism that last season's 4-0 finish may have generated for me - is now lost. I am really bummed. That said, I wonder how excited Favre is to get his new "weapons" in Jackson, Jones, Clowney, Wynn and Harris...
     
  17. Arles

    Arles Cheesehead

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    Re: A TYPICAL PACKER FAN DRAFT REVIEW

    First, I think your analysis was solid and I can see your point of view. I don't agree with most of your points, but I found your post very reasonable.

    This is the type of logic I really don't get. First for Bush, there's a legit chance you won't get one productive down from Bush in all of 2007. With all this "push for Favre", why would you draft a RB that may not even play a down in the second round? The only way you make a pick like this is if you have a proven RB (ie Buffalo with McGahee) and can afford to sit him.

    As to Irons, Leonard, Pittman and Jackson - all were within 5-6 "points" of each other (/100) at Scouts, inc. If you chose 5 different draft sites, you'd see these guys ordered in 5 different ways. All had warts - durability/size (Jackson, Irons, Pittman), speed (Leonard), or unable to carry the load (all). Saying someone like Pittman or Irons is much less of a reach than Jackson is simply not true. All were similar in value and seems reasonable to take the back who ran in a system that was very familiar to what GB does (Jackson). I could see saying this if GB passed on Irons to take Garrett Wolfe, but all these guys were close in value. You can say you don't like the pick, but to act like it's a reach and someone like Pittman or Bush would have been less of a reach simply isn't true.

    The only reasonable argument in this draft is to say GB should have traded up to take Lynch. IMO, though, Lynch is going to be the traditional Cal back and flop in the NFL. Being a Pac-10 fan, I saw Lynch enough to know he's not the guy I want for GB. He would put up 150 yards against Portland State or Minnesota, but get held to 80 or under against Tennessee, USC or UCLA.
     
  18. TOPHAT

    TOPHAT Cheesehead

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    Re: A TYPICAL PACKER FAN DRAFT REVIEW


    THE QUOTE IS A DRAFT ANALYSIS BY TYPICAL PACKER FANL
     
  19. TOPHAT

    TOPHAT Cheesehead

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    REVIEWS: SUMMARY

    http://www.jsonline.com/story/index.aspx?id=598681

    Draftniks grade Packers

    What better way to follow the most over-covered annual sports event on television than to examine the rush to judgment by a bunch of guys who dutifully ignore common sense because premature evaluation and hair-trigger analysis is what NFL football culture demands? We, of course, are referring to, respectively, the National Football League draft and the grades assigned to teams by some writers or broadcasters. The following list includes the draft grader's name and affiliation, his grade and a brief comment contained in the analysis of the Green Bay Packers' 2007 draft:

    • Don Pierson, Chicago Tribune, Grade B. "With 11 picks, general manager Ted Thompson continued his pattern of quantity without trying to impress anybody with flashy picks." Pierson gave eight teams higher grades.

    • Rick Gosselin, Dallas Morning News, Grade C. "The Packers had the best seventh round, selecting a 2,000-yard career rusher with 4.47 speed (DeShawn Wynn) and a TE with 143 career catches (Clark Harris). But they reached twice in the third round for (James) Jones and (Aaron) Rouse." Gosselin gave 12 teams better grades, including Minnesota, which he gave an A-plus.

    • Jim Trotter, San Diego Union-Tribune, Grade C. "Harrell fills a need but middle of the first round is too high. (Brandon) Jackson was a reach, Jones was overvalued and Rouse is considered a tweener." Trotter gave 25 teams higher grades.

    • Mel Kiper Jr., ESPN, Grade C-plus. "Defensive tackle Justin Harrell didn't fill need, but the Packers chose the best available player over need. Harrell was hurt most of his senior season, but that didn't hurt his stock much. RB Brandon Jackson, if he can build on his strong finish to 2006, has a chance to be Green Bay's starting running back."

    • Pete Prisco, cbssportsline.com, Grade B. "(Justin Harrell) will be a force in the middle of their line." Prisco gave nine teams higher grades.

    • Tony Moss, Sportsnetwork.com, Grade C-minus. "The franchise might have engaged in the reach of the entire draft by selecting Jones on the first day." Moss had 27 teams with better grades.

    • Paul Zimmerman, SI.com, Grade C-plus. "The guy who intrigues me, though, is David Clowney, a fifth-round flier and one thing Brett can still do is gun it deep." Sixteen teams got better grades from Dr. Z.

    • Charles Robinson, Yahoo! Sports, Grade C-minus. "A tremendous risk for the 16th overall pick." He gave 12 NFC teams better grades.

    There was at least one draft observer who chose another kind of rating system.

    Tom Weir, USA Today, gave the Packers two stars on four-star scale, meaning "holes (were) plugged, but leaks remain." Weir wrote: "Justin Harrell didn't fill a need with the first-round pick and at No. 16 was taken ahead of projections."

    There were other draftniks who did not rate teams, but offered analysis of their choices:

    • Keith Kidd, Scouts Inc.: "Green Bay is a true-value team; it relies heavily on its player stack, and Tennessee DT Justin Harrell was easily the best player left on the Packers' board. The addition of Harrell continues a youth movement on the defensive side of the ball. GM Ted Thompson is building this team around a tough defense. I thought the pick here could have been Michigan DL Alan Branch, or perhaps a playmaking WR. Harrell is an impressive athlete for his size, but has never been a really effective inside pass rusher. But he has potential to develop into a good two-down player in the NFL. It is a little bit of a reach in our view since he was ranked 30th on our board."

    • Unsigned comment, Scouts Inc. at ESPN Insider site: "Make no mistake about it; Justin Harrell is a talented player, and staying away from a player who has problems keeping his weight down like Alan Branch makes sense considering the problems the Packers had with Grady Jackson. However, tight end is a far greater need and Greg Olsen was still on the board, so they probably could have gotten a little more bang for the buck here."

    • John Clayton, ESPN Insider: "The Packers didn't wow anyone with their selections of defensive tackle Justin Harrell and running back Brandon Jackson in the first two rounds. Unfortunately for Packers fans, (Randy) Moss favored the Patriots over the Packers in what appeared to be a trade of convenience for the Raiders and Moss."

    • Don Banks, SI.com, said Favre was one of the "losers" in the draft, because he didn't get a running back or receiver in the first pick. "What's a living legend to do? Any chance No. 4 will retire in protest?"
     
  20. Packnic

    Packnic Cheesehead

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    OFFICIAL 2007 DRAFT PACK REVIEWS & GRADE

    i think theres something to this reggie white wearing number 92 and playing at Tennessee thing. Both are above average athletic big men. but are very very strong players. Both seem to be regarded as good people in general. i see a lot of similarites between reggie and Justin. not sayin he will be as good, i just see a bunch of one in the other. im tellin you now... i feel good about this pick
     
  21. TOPHAT

    TOPHAT Cheesehead

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    SI AND ESPN DRAFT REVIEWS

    http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2007/writers/peter_king/05/01/postdraft/1.html

    Peter King's funny response to fan's email:

    PACKER NATION IS NOT PLEASED. Q. "I think the Packers flunked this draft for failing to address any of their needs and giving Brett a chance to win now. Your thoughts?''

    A. I don't like having a major need at receiver and drafting the 13th and 21st wideouts in the draft. I said to someone after the first three rounds: "Favre's got to be throwing a shoe through his TV right now.''
    ____________________________________________________________________________________

    http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/columns/story?columnist=clayton_john&id=2858916

    Can Brett Favre be happy with the Packers' offseason? Favre had a great time last season. The Packers went 8-8. Favre liked his young offensive line and his young receiver, Greg Jennings. Optimistic about the chances of going to the playoffs, Favre returned for another season. So far, he's been greeted with an offseason in which cornerback Frank Walker was the only acquisition in free agency. He lost his backfield mate, Ahman Green. The running game enters the unknown with rookie Brandon Jackson and Vernand Morency. Nothing was done at tight end. Everyone remembers how Favre struggled mentally and emotionally in the 4-12 season in 2005. He wondered why he came back. Favre hates to lose. He wants one more chance at a Super Bowl, but at the very least, he wants another shot at the playoffs. Football is fun for Favre, but he needs to have more winning to make it fun enough to stay motivated.
    __________________________________________________________________________________

    ESPN Mel Kiper: Green Bay Packers: GRADE: C+

    Defensive tackle Justin Harrell didn't fill need, but the Packers chose the best available player over need. Harrell was hurt most of his senior season, but that didn't hurt his stock much. RB Brandon Jackson, if he can build on his strong finish to 2006, has a chance to be Green Bay's starting running back. James Jones was a decent third-round pick, a good wide receiver with natural receiving skills; safety Aaron Rouse is just an OK third-round pick; offensive tackle Allen Barbre is a bit overrated because he doesn't play as well as he tested during workouts. WR David Clowney has a lot of speed, and inside linebackers Korey Hall and Desmond Bishop should make it in the NFL as backups. Place-kicker Mason Crosby was a really good find in the sixth round. He has a great leg and has kicked in all kinds of weather playing at Colorado and in the Big 12. Crosby is not a product of the altitude in Colorado. I also liked the Packers' seventh-round picks: RB Deshawn Wynn from Florida and Rutgers tight end Clark Harris.
     
  22. TOPHAT

    TOPHAT Cheesehead

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    UPDATE

    EDITING.
     
  23. MassPackersFan

    MassPackersFan Cheesehead

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    OFFICIAL 2007 DRAFT PACK REVIEWS & GRADE

    If anyone thinks an impact DT isn't a position of need they didn't watch us last year. I like Williams and Cole, but they're just average NFL DT's.
     
  24. TOPHAT

    TOPHAT Cheesehead

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    WSJ DRAFT REVIEWS

    http://www.madison.com/wsj/home/column/index.php?ntid=131761&ntpid=3

    Wilde: High or low grade? JASON WILDE

    GREEN BAY - Grading your favorite NFL team's draft right after it ends is akin to reviewing a restaurant after sitting down, sipping the water and placing your order off the menu. You haven't even dug into your house salad or the complimentary breadbasket yet, and already you've decided that Green Bay Packers general manager Ted Thompson's cooking stinks. Thompson, like his mentor Ron Wolf before him, said Sunday he believes "it takes three years" to decide if a draft is a success or failure.
    Thompson also admitted that even when your rookies contribute right away - like last year, when linebacker A.J. Hawk, wide receiver Greg Jennings and offensive linemen Daryn Colledge, Jason Spitz and Tony Moll all started - you can't judge your draft. "Because initially, you can (get) really excited and then by the end of the first season you think, 'Boy, this is a great draft.' And then over the course over the next couple of years, it doesn't really work out," Thompson said. "Then (other) times guys are a little bit slower starters."
    Of course, while we won't be giving you any grades, we're happy to pass along the insta-graders' analysis. Sports Illustrated's Paul "Dr. Z" norton and ESPN's Mel Kiper each gave the Packers a C-plus. The Dallas Morning News' Rick Gosselin gave them a C. The three highest grades came from CBS Sportsline's Pete Prisco, who correctly predicted that the Packers would take defensive tackle Justin Harrell at No. 16 and might have let that color his judgment a little, as he gave the Packers a B; The Sporting News, which gave the Packers a B-minus; and the Chicago Tribune's Don Pierson, who gave the Packers a B and praised Thompson because he "continued his pattern of quantity without trying to impress anybody with flashy picks." The Washington Post's Mark Maske wasn't quite as impressed, giving the Packers a D grade because "the 16th pick was too high" for Harrell, and Thompson "couldn't complete a trade for wide receiver Randy Moss as many around the league - and within the organization - expected." Even on the team's Web site, opinions were mixed. As of Monday night, almost 24,000 fans had voted in the club's online poll, and the Cs had it (35 percent) over the As (5 percent), Bs (27 percent), Ds (18 percent) and Fs (12 percent).
    But if you insist on criticizing Thompson for something - and actually want to have a strong argument - complain about this: The Cleveland Browns, desperate to take free-falling Notre Dame quarterback (and Ohio native) Brady Quinn, called and offered their 2008 first-round pick, plus to flip-flop picks with the Packers in Rounds 2, 3 and 4, for the Packers' first-round pick at 16. "I thought it was going to work," Cleveland GM Phil Savage told SI's Peter King. "But (the Packers) thought about it, called back and said no." The Browns ended up sending their second-round pick (No. 36) and their first-round pick next year to the Dallas Cowboys to move into Dallas' No. 22 spot to take Quinn.
    No offense to Quinn and University of Wisconsin left tackle Joe Thomas, whom the Browns drafted No. 3 overall, but how much better are the Browns really going to be with a rookie quarterback and rookie left tackle in their lineup this year? Their 2008 first-round pick could be in the top 10 - as could the Packers' if they fall back from their 8-8 finish - and with some hard-line negotiating, Thompson (who has traded back all 15 times he's swung a deal during the eight drafts he's run) could have extracted an even greater price from Savage this year, such as the Browns' second-round pick at No. 36, plus flip-flopping in the later rounds. But Thompson apparently was committed to taking Harrell, and he admitted he's against trading for future picks - something he's never done.
    "I don't know (why). I've never really been able to figure that one out, quite frankly," Thompson said when I asked him about it. "I normally don't do that." In this instance, he should have. At least then he'd have a better chance at a high grade next year.
    __________________________________________________________________________

    http://www.madison.com/wsj/home/column/oates//index.php?ntid=131696&ntpid=1

    Oates: Packers didn't get the big one TOM OATES

    Admit it, you were waiting for Ted Thompson to hit a home run, weren't you? As the NFL draft wound its way through seven rounds over two days, you hoped sooner or later the Green Bay Packers general manager would jack one out of the park. Alas, Thompson kept hitting singles. Lots of singles. Good, solid singles that yielded 11 players who will solidify the roster and, in all likelihood, make the Packers better.
    There were, however, no long balls. No franchise-altering moves. No infusion of offensive playmakers. No reason to think the team will be dramatically improved in 2007. Mostly, there was no Randy Moss.
    Moss, the troublesome yet supremely talented wide receiver, has been on the Packers' radar screen for months. Everyone knew Oakland had to trade Moss after two unproductive and unhappy seasons and Green Bay looked like the likely landing spot for him. When Thompson kept making safe, by-the-book moves to improve his 8-8 team Saturday, the Packers GM appeared to be operating under the assumption he had a good chance of adding Moss to his punchless offense when the festivities began again Sunday. Thompson even admitted he went home Saturday night thinking he would have a shot at trading for Moss in the morning.
    Instead, Thompson turned on the television Sunday and discovered that New England had beaten him to the punch. The Raiders traded Moss to the Patriots for a paltry fourth-round pick (No. 110 overall) after Moss agreed to a restructured contract for one year and a dirt cheap $3 million. The best pick the Packers had to offer at that point was No. 112, but this wasn't a question of getting aced out by two spots in the middle of the draft. No, this was a question of how aggressive one must be to build a team. Patriots coach Bill Belichick, stung by two title-free seasons after winning three Super Bowls in four years, was swinging for the fences. Thompson, as we have discovered, doesn't step to the plate with that mentality.
    A league source told the Wisconsin State Journal the Packers offered only a fifth-round pick for Moss, which probably meant they finished last among the handful of teams with an interest in him. Indeed, Green Bay's refusal to pursue Moss with the vigor of the Patriots revealed a fundamental flaw in the way Thompson operates. At some point when building a team, a general manager has to take a chance or two. He can add draft picks in large numbers to his roster and make his team competitive, as Thompson has done, but that will only take a team so far. To get a team to the elite level - which, incidentally, is where the Patriots are - he has to make some bold personnel moves.
    Thompson has refused to do that since January even though the Packers appeared to turn the corner late last season. He declined to trade up for much-needed halfback Marshawn Lynch in the first round of the draft. He has declined to pursue unrestricted free agents. And he made only a cursory attempt to acquire Moss. "What we try to do is everything in our power to try to help make this team as good as it can be," Thompson said. "You have to take a lot of things into consideration. Sometimes it's an aggressive move, sometimes that aggressive move is not the appropriate time. But you just keep doing everything you can to make the team better and that's all you can do."
    The Patriots aren't acting like that's all you can do, which is why they've become the favorites to win the Super Bowl next season. With no quality receivers on his roster, Belichick attacked the problem, adding Moss, Donte Stallworth, Wes Welker and Kelley Washington, veterans with 156 catches, 2,080 yards and 10 touchdowns among them last season.
    Meanwhile, the Packers, who need playmakers in the passing game even more than the Patriots, added James Jones and David Clowney, the 13th and 21st wide receivers taken in the draft, respectively. Jones was considered undraftable by most NFL teams, yet Thompson used a third-round draft pick on him. Better he had taken that pick and traded for Moss. After all, who would you rather have catching passes next year, Moss or Jones? Belichick answered that question by landing Moss. Thompson answered it by hitting singles. Or it is possible he just struck out?
     
  25. TOPHAT

    TOPHAT Cheesehead

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    PACKER NATION 2007 DRAFT REVIEW POLL: SO FAR

    :feedback: :feedback: :twocents: :twocents:
     

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