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Packers Individual Game DVD's

Discussion in 'Packer Fan Forum' started by Jimbo, Jun 5, 2015.

  1. Jimbo

    Jimbo Cheesehead

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    Hey,

    Is there a site that sells individual games on DVD?

    We attended the Bears game last year from the London,UK & would love the game on DVD as a keepsake.

    cheers in advance
    J
     
  2. buggybill2003

    buggybill2003 Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    In the first instance, have you approached the BBC ? They might be able to help you.
     
  3. Jimbo

    Jimbo Cheesehead

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    I have approached Channel 4 who screened the game live, I am awaiting a response. I will also send a mail to the Packers & see if they can help.
     
  4. buggybill2003

    buggybill2003 Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    I genuinely thought the BBC had been televising the games for the past few years ?? I was at that game too.
     
  5. Jimbo

    Jimbo Cheesehead

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    Do you live in England?

    Channel 4, Eurosport & SKY Sports show the games here.
     
  6. buggybill2003

    buggybill2003 Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Yes, I`m English. I thought BBC1 showed the games now, or they certainly DID at one time. Have you looked on e-bay too ? I bought some early games on there. The Cincinnati game where Favre got his first win. Just an idea !
     
  7. HardRightEdge

    HardRightEdge Cheesehead

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    On a semi-related matter, Yahoo has purchased the rights to broadcast the London game on Oct. 25 between the Bills and Jags which will be streamed live, free and globally. The game will be produced by NFL crews and broadcast on TV in the Buffalo and Jacksonville markets.

    http://mmqb.si.com/2015/06/03/yahoo-nfl-internet-broadcast-mailbag/

    This development is of some consequence as an initial test case for the NFL in assessing whether internet streaming is a viable alternative to the network TV and cable/dish middlemen.

    Looking far into the future, it is conceivable the NFL might set up their own "internet network". They already have the production capability; they would need to add internet channels, a cloud services contract, and an advertising sales team. Netflix has done the heavy lifting themselves, producing and delivering their own content over the internet on a subscription basis. There's no reason the NFL couldn't provide live streaming for free (as with Yahoo in this case), generating revenue through advertising. Why? They would not have to share the advertising pie with middlemen.

    The hurdles are daunting politically. The right to free local market NFL broadcasts might as well be a Constitutional amendment. All you need is a tube TV and rabbit ears. Somehow I don't think the NFL suspending local blackouts entirely starting this year was strictly an internal decision. But if at some point high speed internet and wifi enabled TVs (or least ones with USB ports ) become nearly universal (just as cable/dish subscriptions are nearly universal even among the poor, this concept will become more viable.
     
  8. captainWIMM

    captainWIMM Cheesehead

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    I know that the NFL faces a difficult legal situation to offer live games on the internet but they already do that in Europe and other parts of the world.

    A subscription to NFL Game Pass allows fans to watch every single game live on the internet as well as access to NFL Network 24/7 either on the computer or mobile devices.
     
  9. Mike Berry

    Mike Berry Cheesehead

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    Hi folks, just an FYI I have been taping packer games since 1992, I have hundred of games mostly on video tape. Dvd since 2004 however. I don't sell these but I'm willing to help out someone who really wants to see a old game. I even have most playoff games as well. Mike
     
  10. HardRightEdge

    HardRightEdge Cheesehead

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    I wouldn't characterize it as a "legal situation" in the US so much as a case of having contracts with the networks which prevent it. The networks' US rights to exclusivity are broad and ironclad. This Yahoo broadcast is possible because either (1) it falls in some narrow margin outside the contract exclusivity, perhaps by virtue of being broadcast in the teams' local markets and that it starts at 9:30 AM Eastern time or (2) perhaps the NFL bought back or swapped something for the "national" rights from a network in order to sell them to Yahoo.

    In any event, as a network contract for US rights expires, there's no contractual or legal issue I can think of preventing the NFL from producing and delivering themselves their content exclusively over the internet.

    The issues are:

    (1) Market penetration of high speed internet and wifi-TVs as opposed to nearly 100% market penetration today with at least a tube TV and rabbit ears, the primary exceptions being the tiny minority who don't own a TV as a lifestyle choice. There will be a tipping point. In my market, the cable provider offers high-speed internet for $15 per month with a guarantee the fee will not be increased (in other words, it's not a teaser rate). A person of modest means could dump his conventional cell phone contract, switch to a pre-pay, and buy a high speed service at this price and save money in the bargain. Also, some people of modest means have not upgraded from their tube TV. In the not distant future, only a tiny minority of TVs in operation will lack wifi capability (or at least a USB port where you can plug in a wifi dongle for next to nothing) as tube TVs and early generation flat screens die off.

    (2) After that, the biggest hurdle is political.

    Living in a market where the team has not made the playoffs in 15 years and where the weather can be brutal during late season games, threatened blackouts have been common. While local businessmen usually step up and buy some thousands of tickets or the team will buy them themselves, it's a dirty little secret that the NFL allows teams to sharply discount the tickets in bulk sales at a certain point before game time or the teams can buy their own tickets for a fraction of face value. Also, visiting teams split the gate something like 60/40 excluding some premier seating...not filling seats at full price affects every team.

    The NFL's line on suspending blackouts is that the TV rites revenue is now big enough to offset the loss of ticket sales in blackout scenarios. Well, that's been true for awhile. This is largely a political issue. There is a strong sentiment in Buffalo (and I imagine the 5 or 10 other markets that struggle to sell out at one time or another) that taxpayer support for NFL stadiums grant the populace the "right" to free viewership of every Bills game. That's what I meant by it being nearly a Constitution amendment that everybody has the right see games on TV for free.

    Whenever a threatened blackout rears it's ugly head, it's a big issue in this town, the writers write about it, and fan ire turns toward the team that took public money and the politicians who support it.

    Further, the NFL (along with the other US professional leagues) operate under anti-trust exemptions granted by Congress allowing, among other things, player drafts and salary caps. Whenever Congressmen get heat over some issue in pro sports (e.g., drugs, concussions), they conduct a show trial, dragging the sport into session for interrogations. The sports inevitably take some action, even if modestly and slowly.

    In other words, pro sports in the US operate at the pleasure of Congress with anti-trust exemptions held over their head as a cudgel if our erstwhile representatives start to feel political heat over some issue.

    If the NFL went exclusively to an internet model because they could simply make more money that way, while cutting out a meaningful percent of the population who have not embraced the necessary technology (just as they cut out the viewing public in past blackouts) resulting in a sufficiently loud hue and cry, there's a good chance Congress would find some pretense to come down on the league with a hammer.
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2015
    • Informative Informative x 1
  11. HardRightEdge

    HardRightEdge Cheesehead

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    The options are more limited in the US. Since foreign viewership is limited, the sale price on those rights are a fraction of the US network deals. The changing landscape might not affect so much a European such as yourself...unless American football can take off in Europe making those broadcast rights more valuable.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1

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