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Odd call that might explain Jennings to Driver lateral

Discussion in 'All Other Team Discussions' started by longtimefan, Nov 26, 2006.

  1. longtimefan

    longtimefan Super Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator

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    I recall someone asking about the Jennings "lateral" to Driver in the Vikings game, and what would have happened if Driver wouldnt have grabbed it..

    I believe this is pretty much the same thing..

    ~~~~~~~~~~~



    Updated: Nov. 26, 2006, 7:38 PM ET
    Odd, but correct, call brings confusion in S.D. gameESPN.com news services



    SAN DIEGO -- A moment of celebration by San Diego receiver Vincent Jackson turned into 10 minutes of confusion in the fourth quarter of the Chargers game with the rival Oakland Raiders.

    With the Chargers trailing 14-7 and facing fourth-and-2 from the Raiders 40, Jackson caught a 13-yard pass from Philip Rivers, rolled to the ground untouched, then stood up and spun the ball forward.

    Oakland's Fabian Washington jumped on the ball, believing it was a fumble, and setting off 10 minutes of confusion as the referees sorted it out.

    Referee Mike Carey originally signaled Oakland's possession, but then the Chargers were flagged for illegal forward pass. Even with the 5-yard penalty for the illegal pass, the Chargers still had a first down, at the 32.

    Four plays later, LaDainian Tomlinson threw a 19-yard touchdown pass to Antonio Gates to tie the game at 14.

    While the call was questioned on the field, NFL Supervisor of Officials Mike Pereira confirmed to ESPN's Chris Mortensen that the call was correct -- and not without precedent.

    It is illegal to intentionally fumble a ball forward and, by rule, an illegal forward fumble is an incomplete pass. That makes it a dead ball. A 5-yard penalty is then assessed from the spot.

    Jackson spinning the ball forward when he was not down by contact constituted an intentional illegal forward fumble and thus an illegal forward pass. Had he spun it backward, it would have been a live fumble.


    A similar call was made when Plaxico Burress did the same thing with the Steelers on Oct. 1, 2000.
     
  2. Zero2Cool

    Zero2Cool I own a website

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    I could be misunderstanding the jist of this post with this comment. Jennings lateralled the ball backwards and if it wasn't caught it would have been a fumble unless it passed his forward progress.

    Did I just paraphrase the thread content? Sorry. If I did.
     
  3. GakkofNorway

    GakkofNorway Cheesehead

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    In American football and Canadian football a lateral pass — usually called simply a lateral, but officially called a "backward pass" in American football, and also called an "onside pass" in Canadian football — is a sideways or rearward throwing of the football to a teammate. The pass cannot itself advance the ball, though of course the receiver can advance after catching it. This is distinguished from a forward pass, which moves the ball closer to the goal line. The rules allow forward passes to be thrown only from behind the line of scrimmage.

    There are virtually no restrictions on the use of laterals. Any number of laterals may be thrown in a given play. Any player may throw a lateral from any position on the field to any other player. (But if the lateral is thrown from beyond the line of scrimmage and it advances the ball, it is considered an illegal forward pass.) If the lateral is complete and the receiver is behind the line of scrimmage, the receiver may in turn throw a forward pass. If the defensive team takes possession of the ball, they may also freely throw laterals, but not forward passes.

    Unlike a forward pass, if a lateral hits the ground or an official, play continues. Like a fumble, a backward pass that has hit the ground may be recovered by either side. In NFL rules a backward pass other than the snap, if muffed by a receiver before it first touches the ground, after it touches the ground the ball becomes dead if an opponent recovers it.

    The oxymoron "forward lateral" is used to describe a lateral pass that actually went forward.

    In college football, the lateral is used more extensively than in professional football, more in the same manner as is done in the two different sports of rugby union and rugby league.

    One infamous college play involving the lateral pass is simply known as The Play. In the 1982 Big Game between Stanford and University of California, Berkeley (also known as California or Cal), with four seconds left and trailing by one point, Cal ran the ball back on a kickoff all the way for the game-winning touchdown using five laterals, eventually running through the Stanford Band who had already taken the field (assuming that the game was already over).

    A well-known NFL lateral pass occurred during the Music City Miracle play at the end of the 2000 playoff game between the Tennessee Titans and the Buffalo Bills.

    Another well known lateral in the NFL was the River City Relay, which was when the New Orleans Saints faced the Jacksonville Jaguars. With time winding down the Saints lateraled 3 times and brought it all the way down the field for a touchdown and then the unthinkable happened: kicker John Carney missed the potentially game-tying extra point for the Saints, and the Saints lost 20-19.

    In the 2006 Rose Bowl game between The University of Texas and The University of Southern California, Reggie Bush of USC attempted a lateral to his teammate which resulted in a fumble that was then recovered by Texas. However, the lateral was an illegal forward attempt, in which a penalty should have been imposed against USC--the play should have been blown dead and a penalty of five yards assessed. Ironically, the referees missed the forward lateral, and the lack of such penalty proved detrimental to USC. Conversely in the same game, Vince Young of UT successfully converted a lateral to his teammate which was carried in for a touchdown. Texas would go on to win the game 41-38.
     
  4. longtimefan

    longtimefan Super Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator

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    AHHHHH..

    I know what it was now...

    We were wondering if Brett was given credit for the extra yards Driver ran, and if Driver got rushing yards...

    Sorry for the confusion
     
  5. Zero2Cool

    Zero2Cool I own a website

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    STOP CONFUSIAILATIOWIUTAOIWUTOING ME! :p lol
     
  6. GakkofNorway

    GakkofNorway Cheesehead

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    there should be no confusion after my post!
     
  7. ChrisC

    ChrisC Cheesehead

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    Yeah, but ... who was credited with the yards?

    You are right that in Rugby the forward pass is illegal. But I have seen some North American players throw some pretty long "laterals" QB-style in Rugby games!

    Chris
     

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