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Any wisconsin residents ever been to lower michigan

Discussion in 'The Atrium' started by Packerbacker04, May 11, 2006.

  1. Packerbacker04

    Packerbacker04 Cheesehead

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    I just thought I would ask? Anyone else wonder why the UP is not considered a part of Wisconsin?
     
  2. Zero2Cool

    Zero2Cool I own a website

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    I've been to the U.P. before, not the L.P. though.
    Code:
    The peninsula is home to 328,000 people, only about 3% of the state's population, living in almost one-third of the state's land area. Residents are colloquially known as Yoopers, (from "U.P.ers") and many consider themselves Yoopers before they consider themselves Michiganders. (People living in the Lower Peninsula are commonly called "trolls" by Upper Peninsula residents, as they live "Under da Bridge.") This regionalism is not only a result of the physical separation of the two peninsulas, but also the history of the state.
    
    When the Michigan Territory was first established, it included only the Lower Peninsula and the eastern portion of the Upper Peninsula. In 1819 the territory was expanded to include the remainder of the Upper Peninsula, all of Wisconsin, and part of Minnesota (previously included in the Indiana and Illinois Territories). But when Michigan was preparing for statehood in the 1830s, the boundaries proposed corresponded to the original territorial boundaries, with some proposals even leaving the Upper Peninsula out entirely. Meanwhile, the territory was involved in a border dispute with the state of Ohio in a conflict known as the Toledo War. The people of Michigan approved a constitution in May 1835 and had elected state officials in late autumn 1835. Although the state government was unrecognized by the United States Congress, the territorial government effectively ceased to exist. A constitutional convention of the state legislature refused a compromise to accept the full Upper Peninsula in exchange for ceding the Toledo Strip to Ohio. A second convention, hastily convened by Governor Stevens Thomson Mason, consisting primarily of Mason supporters, finally agreed to accept the U.P. for the Toledo Strip in December 1836. In January 1837, the U.S. Congress admitted Michigan as a state of the Union. At the time, Michigan was considered the losing party in the deal because of the apparently less valuable land, but the Upper Peninsula’s rich mineral wealth was soon discovered, and Michigan instead seemed the winner.
    
    It would generally be a misconception to say that residents of the Western Upper Peninsula regard themselves as more part of Wisconsin than Michigan. While the cities and universities of Wisconsin, particularly Green Bay, are more accessible than those of the Lower Peninsula, the typical high school graduate from the UP will likely look first to local universities, and then to the Lower Peninsula schools, rather than to Wisconsin schools. This, of course, has much to do with the fact that a Michigan student would pay the much higher non-resident tuition at a Wisconsin state university than at a Michigan university. While a trip downstate is often rather difficult (A trip from Ironwood to Detroit is roughly 600 miles long, more than twice the distance to Minneapolis and almost as long as a trip to St. Louis), it will still be done often enough. Commonly, people of the Western UP will go to Minneapolis or Wisconsin for trips of pleasure (especially shopping), but they have managed to retain identity with Michigan. Residents of the northeastern part of the U.P. may cross the Sault Ste. Marie International Bridge to Canada more often than they cross the Mackinac Bridge to the Lower Peninsula, and often associate themselves as closer to Northern Ontario. Additionally, although they are not technically a part of the Peninsula, Isle Royale and Mackinac Island are generally regarded as parts of it.
    
    There have been intermittent (and not always serious) calls for the Upper Peninsula to declare independence from the United States; these calls receive little popular support. Only slightly more serious is a movement for secession from the state of Michigan; secessionists propose making the peninsula into the state of "Superior" (named for Lake Superior). The region's economic dependence on aid from the Michigan state government makes such proposals very unlikely to be carried forth.
    
    In terms of cultural identity, it may be truest to say that residents of the Upper Peninsula identify far more with fellow Yoopers than with the "trolls" of the Lower Peninsula or the "flatlanders" and "berry pickers" of southern and central Wisconsin. In some parts of northern Wisconsin bumper stickers advocating a new state of Superior are almost as common as they are in the UP itself, since people in northern Wisconsin feel as much ignored by downstate politicians as do people in the UP (presumably the Wisconsin advocates of a new State would expect it to include those counties of Wisconsin adjacent to Lake Superior in addition to the UP).
     
  3. Packerbacker04

    Packerbacker04 Cheesehead

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    I have relatives that live in Iron Mountain and Escanaba so I get up there once in a while but not much. Irom Mountain has lots of hills and Escanaba is beautiful right on lake Michigan. I tend to think Wisconsin is a long way from here since you have to cross the Mackinac or go through Chi town to get there.
     
  4. NiVeK

    NiVeK Cheesehead

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    Either way you look at it, Wisconsin gets screwed.
    Michigan gets the rights to the UP and the naming rights to the lake! BS!!!
    I wonder, however, what the ratio of Packer fans to Lion fans it is up there!?!? Anyone.....?


    (p.s. Anyone seen the movie "Escanaba In Da Moonlight?" If not, go check it out. It's really only funny to people who live in Wisconsin or the UP. You know, northerners..... There's a guy from WI in the movie, and guess which angle they take with it? Yup....he drinks A LOT!!! All they drink is Leinenkugel's mmmmm. Anyways, I diverse....GO SEE IT!)
     
  5. yooperfan

    yooperfan Cheesehead

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    By far, I would guess 75%- 25%, Yoopers in the central and western parts of the U.P. tend to be Packer fans whereas people in the eastern U.P. tend to be Lion fans.
    The eastern U.P. would generally be considered anything east of a line running from Newberry to Manistique.
    Most Yoopers west of that imaginary line prefer to travel to Wisconsin for sporting events, concerts and shopping. You can hardly ever attend a Packer or Brewer game or shop in Green Bay without running into a Yooper.
     
  6. cheesey

    cheesey Cheesehead

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    For a couple years in the late 1980's i lived 25 miles south of "Iron on Mountain". I even worked at the "Mr. Donut" shop up there. It's a beautiful area, with lots of Packer fans. I have never been to lower Michigan yet.
    Oh.....and i DID see "Escanaba in da moonlight".......i enjoyed it!
    To me, the U.P. is more Wisconsin then Michigan.
    Oh......i even have a CD of "Da Yoopers" (And several old cassette tapes!) Funny stuff!
     
  7. gopackgo4

    gopackgo4 Cheesehead

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    Ive seen Escanaba in da moonlight. I thought it was Ok.
     
  8. MontanaBob

    MontanaBob Cheesehead

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    I've seen Detroit in the daylight and it ain't pretty. :shock:
     
  9. Packerbacker04

    Packerbacker04 Cheesehead

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    I can pick up a few wisconsin radio stations from Green bay and a couple from Milwaukee but it only happens during the summer because its 100 or so miles across the bay.
     
  10. Packerbacker04

    Packerbacker04 Cheesehead

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    Auburn hills the suburb is a sweet city. Detroit has some bad areas but it does have its nice areas. I went to a pistons game down there a month back and it has some beautiful areas.
     
  11. MontanaBob

    MontanaBob Cheesehead

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    I hear ya Packerbacker04. I was there many years ago for some meetings and we were not in the best parts of town. We were supposed to be in Ann Arbor, but they changed to site at the last minute.
     
  12. net

    net Cheesehead

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    ----

    I live in Rhinelander, Wi. Oneida county, one hour from the Michigan border. I haven't seen a "Superior" or "51st State" bumper sticker in 20 years.

    What is happening is land in the U.P.(and here in northern Wi.) is being gobbled up by developers who see lots of rich people in cities who want to come up here to "vacation". It's a spin off from the old days where working class families would come north via train to a resort, spend a week in a cabin, fish, swim and enjoy the outdoors then leave. Now some come to their condo with their personal watercraft to annoy, talk down to the locals, and generally be obnoxious. Not all, but enough to set a pattern.

    What most of the 'flatlanders'(or FIBS, f------ Illinois B-------) want is a spot away from the congestion of the big city, but want all the amenities they have at home. I can't tell you how many folks have come up here thinking they could operate some little shop to only see it fade in a season. There still aren't that many year-round customers here, fewer in the U.P.

    Indian casinos are also changing the landscape here and the U.P. There's lots of money on the reservations now, and many of the jobs and services are filled by the neighboring Caucasian community. Most of the casino customers are white senior citizens, spending their children's inheritance.

    The U.P. is where I go to get away from the tourists who come here from down south to get away from it all. The U.P. is one of the last mostly unspoiled spots in the country. It's just far enough away that the flatlanders don't want to drive that far.

    I don't see a 51st state movement happening again until the U.P. can find a steady economic base.
     
  13. net

    net Cheesehead

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    One other thing: I used to live in Marinette, Wi. The bars there(especially on the Michigan side) hold dual football loyalities to the Packers and the Lions. I concur that most of the western half of the U.P. is more closely allied to Wisconsin than Michigan. From Ironwood, Michigan to Lansing is at least 10 hours drive, maybe more.

    Minnesotans are starting to infest the western U.P. as well, with their version of "see how much money I have little people' mentality we often see from the FIBS.
     
  14. big3

    big3 Cheesehead

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    I live halfway between Detroit and Lansing, and halfway between Flint and Ann Arbor. I've never been to the UP, but I do feel insulted by being called a troll. I've heard it's very beatiful and layed back in the UP.
     
  15. cheesey

    cheesey Cheesehead

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    Don't let it bother you Big3! It's just a nickname! We are "Cheeseheads" and i could feel insulted, but i choose to embrace it!
    The U.P. IS beautiful! I have spent MANY days there! (I haven't seen a MOOSE yet though!)
     
  16. yooperfan

    yooperfan Cheesehead

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    Cheesey,
    Ive seen more moose than deer over the last couple of years.
    There is a snowmobile trail by my camp that they like to wander down in the summer and fall.
    I always walk down that trail in the fall partridge hunting and wonder what would happen if I ran into one of those bulls when he is all wound up during the rut.
    By the way I'm really impressed that you have some of Da Yoopers tapes.
     
  17. 4packgirl

    4packgirl Cheesehead

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    well, from one "flatlander", you should enjoy the boost we bring to your economy & hush it up!!! :wink:
    i have been to nearly every state in the continental U.S. & by far, my favorite state has always been good ole wisconsin. when i cross the border, i instantly feel like i'm "home" - hard to explain since i've lived my entire life in illinois. :-?

    did somebody say "da yoopers"???? my dad has SEVERAL cassette tapes of them that we have some big laughs listening to!! LOVE those guys! :lol:
     
  18. big3

    big3 Cheesehead

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    free beer, free beer
     
  19. cheesey

    cheesey Cheesehead

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    Oh YEAH dere! WHUH!!! I LOVE Da Yoopers!!!
    I would NOT want to come upon a ramped up bull moose during the rut! If he got ahold of you, there would be nothing left!
    Last night at midnight, i went out to the car to get my wife's pillow, and there was a deer standing 20 yards away, just staring at me. I said to it "What are YOU doing here?" And it stood there for another 15 seconds, then ran off. I have had deer, racoons, possum, rabbitts and even a coyote in my back yard. And i live 25 miles north of Milwaukee!
     

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