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Purdue's Recruiting

Discussion in 'The Atrium' started by uwbadger12000, Feb 14, 2005.

  1. uwbadger12000
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    uwbadger12000 Cheesehead

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    http://www.nfldraftblitz.com/purduecolumn.htm

    A LOOK AT PURDUE'S RECRUITING

    Purdue is ranked twenty-ninth in college football in recruiting according to Rivals.com. Kyle Williams, a five star linebacker recruit from Bolingbrook,Illinois. He is a 6'2" 219 pounder that runs a 4.57 40. Williams was also considering Iowa, Miami (FL), Ohio State, and Oregon. Purdue also landed four star recruit Jason Kacinko, an offensive tackle from Harrison City, Pennsylvania. He is 6'6" and 300 pounds and runs a 5.34 40. His other choices were Florida, Maryland, Michigan State, North Carolina, North Carolina State, Notre Dame, Pittsburgh, and Wisconsin. The Boilermakers also got Selwyn Lymon, a wide receiver from Fort Wayne, Indiana. According to Rivals.com, he was the seventh best wide receiver in the nation for recruiting. Lyman is 6'4" and 190 pounds and runs a 4.4 40. His other college choices included Indiana, Michigan, Ohio State, Penn State, and
    Wisconsin. And the last four start recruit Purdue got was J.B Paxson, a defensive end from Greenwood, Indiana. Paxson was the ninth best high school senior defensive end in the nation according to Rivals.com. He is 6'3" and 260 pounds and runs a 4.81 40. Other college choices for Paxson included Arizona, Florida, and Tennessee.

    There are other recruits, but those are the major ones that I listed. There are a total of twenty-one commitments in all heading to Purdue.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    This is written by me.
  2. eastcoastpacker
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    eastcoastpacker Cheesehead

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    I have a question for anyone on here.How did Purdue get the name Boilermakers. I am a union boilermaker and I was wondering. I saw a friend of mine wear a Purdue boilermakers hat and thought it was neat. Thanks!
  3. uwbadger12000
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    uwbadger12000 Cheesehead

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    Maybe they like trains in Lafayette.
  4. Zero2Cool
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    Zero2Cool Cheesehead

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    Engineering education in the 1890s at Purdue meant hands-on work in the forge room, where students heated and molded metal, just like the "blacksmiths" and "boilermakers" the football team was called after defeating opponents. Newspaper reporters writing about the success of the football team inevitably seized on the manual nature of instruction at Purdue.

    On Oct. 26, 1891, Purdue football players first were called "Boiler Makers" in a Crawfordsville newspaper headline. Another account stated, "Those big fellows from Purdue know how to play football as well as pound the rivets into boilers." No doubt a factor in attaching a railroad nickname to Purdue was the Schenectady locomotive, used from 1891 to 1897 for research.

    The making of the Boilermakers
    The traditional story is that the origin of the nickname "Boilermakers" had to do with an 1889 football game against Wabash College, an ouchy newspaper reporter and - maybe - the Monon Shops.

    The facts:

    Wrong year, right school;

    It was a reporter - or rather a headline writer - who coined the term; and

    No way were players recruited from the Monon Shops.

    Unraveling the legend of the Boilermakers seemed necessary because it is told so many times in so many ways and - let's face it - it's part of Purdue lore, and we should get it right.

    In short, this is the form the legend most often takes: Purdue traveled to Crawfordsville in 1889 to play the Wabash College team, prevailed 18 to 4, and the local newspapers proceeded to hurl epithets after the victors, including the term "boilermakers." The myth is further embellished by adding that the hulking brutes playing for Purdue were recruited from the Monon Shops in Lafayette.

    The last part of the legend is the easiest, so we'll start there.

    Purdue football teams were first called the Boilermakers in 1891. It wasn't until four years later that the Monon Railroad Shops were relocated from New Albany to Lafayette.

    According to "The Monon Route," a history of the Louisville, New Albany and Chicago line, the citizens of Lafayette in 1892 approved a tax levy to help build the shops. They were completed in 1895. So the notion that sooty employees of the "Shops," as the repair depot was known, had a hand in the boilermaker mythmaking is impossible.

    Next we'll take a look at the newspaper article commonly thought to have given the world the term
    "boilermaker" as a scornful nickname for the Old Gold and Black.

    Crawfordsville was served by several daily and weekly papers in 1889, and all were filled with rants of varying shrillness about the Nov. 23 game.

    One article - in the weekly Review - in particular is filled with names that would make most schoolyard bullies blush.

    But despite the fit of pique suffered by the reporter, he doesn't call the Purdue team "boilermakers." For proof, we consult no less an expert than Robert Lackey, Class of 1891 and a player on the first football teams Purdue put on the field.

    Writing in the November 1922 Alumnus, Lackey attempts to trace the origin of "Boilermakers."
    For his story, he went to the trouble of typing in the entire Review account of the Nov. 23, 1889, Wabash-Purdue game.

    Although nowhere in the story are the Purdue players called "boilermakers," he concludes: "While the word 'Boilermakers' does not appear in this remarkable document, it started everybody using the terms 'corn huskers,' 'railsplitters,' 'haymakers,' 'log haulers,' 'blacksmiths,' etc., until these simmered down to the nickname 'Boilermakers,' possibly as a logical composite of all those expressive terms. In any event, we are proud of the name and extend our thanks to the writers of the above for the inspiration."

    It would be two more years before the Purdue team in truth would be labeled "boilermakers," again by a protective local press in response to a defeat of Wabash. The 1891 score was a 44 to 0 drubbing, and the Crawfordsville reporters and editors tried to make up for the poor showing by the locals.

    The headlines in the Oct. 30, 1891, Crawfordsville Star: "A Human Bull Fight!" Beneath that: "The Wabash Reds Fall in a Big Soup Dish and are Stirred Up with Spike Nails - One Man Loses an Ear."

    In the Daily Journal, the reporter writes of the visiting team: "They came, they saw, they conquered, and what is more they cut from Mr. Gentry's ear a piece as large as a slice of roast beef of Old England."

    But the greatest laments could be found in the Daily Argus News of Oct. 26: "Slaughter of Innocents," blared the main headline. Beneath that: "Wabash Snowed Completely Under by the Burly Boiler Makers from Purdue."

    Almost immediately, the Lafayette papers picked up the unique moniker.

    In the Lafayette Sunday Times of Nov. 1, in a story about happenings on campus, we read: "As every one knows, Purdue went down to Wabash last Saturday and defeated their eleven. The Crawfordsville papers have not yet gotten over it. The only resource they have is to claim that we beat the 'scientific' men by brute force. Our players are characterized as 'coal heavers,' 'boiler makers' and 'stevedores.' "

    By October of 1892, the name had entered the lexicon of the writers at the Exponent as they caution the team not to be overconfident after a 4-0 1891 season in which opponents were outscored 192 to 0: "So the 'Boilermakers' may rest assured that they will meet tactics and men far different from those so easily overcome last year."

    But the question lingers as to how the idea was hatched that the 1889 diatribe in the Crawfordsville Review gave birth to "boilermakers."

    One possible explanation is found in an 1895 Exponent special edition published just before the Nov. 28 game between Purdue and the University of Illinois.

    In a summary of the 1889 season, the writer makes reference to the same Review story Robert Lackey would refer to many years later:

    "They called us 'a great big burly gang of corn-huskers' - 'haymakers' - 'log-haulers' - 'pumpkin-shuckers,' and Lackey was 'a boiler-maker,' who went into the Wabash line like a mogul engine, and the more they choked him the happier he seemed to be."

    But what the Review story actually says is: " A blacksmith they had would come into the Wabash boys like a mogul engine and the more they choked him the happier he seemed to be."
    So ends the unraveling of the legend of the Boilermakers. Now, go tell a friend.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Success prompted many nasty names
    In the first four years Purdue competed in intercollegiate football, the team amassed a 5-5 record. That represented one game played in 1887, none in 1888, three in 1889 and six in 1890.

    In 1891, Purdue began to enjoy great success. In fact, the Purdue "eleven" - as teams were called during those early days of football - outscored opponents 192 to 0 in 1891.

    This newfound glory was met with something less than admiration from the competition. And anyone thinking civility is lacking in discourse today should take a look at the names the Purdue players were called back then.

    Purdue in the early 1890s competed in the Indiana Intercollegiate Athletic Association, made up of DePauw, Butler, Wabash, Earlham, Rose Polytechnic and Hanover. These foes - and the yearbooks and papers that chronicled their exploits on the gridiron - left no epithet unhurled. Some examples:

    The editors of the Ouiatenon, the Wabash yearbook, in the 1890 edition reflected on the first-ever game against Purdue. The matchup was played in Crawfordsville in November 1889, and Purdue prevailed 18 to 4.

    "In football she has no rival. Wabash won the state championship in '86, was robbed of it in '87, and would have had it in '89 had she met true football players instead of foundry molders."

    That year, the Wabash-Purdue winner played Butler for the athletic association title, and Butler prevailed 14 to 0. But the Butler Collegian editors couldn't resist pointing out that both football foes that year - DePauw and Purdue - were guilty of using ungentlemanly language:

    "All of which we are led to say by the fact in both of the football games that Butler played in, her opponents used large quantities of most picturesque swear words. Especially is this true of the Purdue game, wherein four of Butler's preachers were opposed to four of Purdue's blacksmiths."

    The likeliest explanation for the "preachers" reference is that Butler was founded in 1855 as Northwestern Christian University and renamed Butler in 1877.

    The Purdue team had a reputation for being roughnecks, both on and off the field. The Nov. 13, 1891, Bema, the DePauw University student newspaper, offered this account of an attempted forfeit by the DePauw team manager in Lafayette, apparently because of excess water on the field:

    "The Purdue boiler-pounders also appeared in uniform demanding a game and scared the little manager to death with their threats, forcing him to go back to our eleven with the assurance that he had no right to make the arrangements. Under protest, with little or no hope of doing anything against the Lafayette amphibians, discouraged and disgusted, our eleven went out to defeat in an immense mud hole, where football was as impossible as spontaneous combustion."

    During those plainspoken days, newspapers that covered rival teams felt compelled to take on Purdue in print.

    History tells us that of all the names the Purdue eleven were called in those early days, only "boilermakers" stuck. Here is a list of names assigned by just the Crawfordsville papers in response to 18 to 4 and 44 to 0 defeats suffered by Wabash in 1889 and 1891:

    Corn-huskers
    Railsplitters
    Haymakers
    Log-haulers
    Sluggers
    Hayseeds
    Pumpkin-shuckers
    Cornfield sailors
    Rolling mill hands
    Grangers
    Clod mashers and lunch punishers from the wilds of Tippecanoe County
    Backwoods farmers
    Blacksmiths

    And that was just Crawfordsville. Imagine what the team was called in all the other papers of the day!
    • Informative Informative x 1
  5. uwbadger12000
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    uwbadger12000 Cheesehead

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    Where did you find this info?
  6. eastcoastpacker
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    eastcoastpacker Cheesehead

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    Thanks alot SlickVision! That is an interesting story. Must have taken you quite a while to get all that infro,and even longer to post it. :joy: :D
  7. Vltrophy
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    Vltrophy Cheesehead

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    Purdue sucks.
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  8. Poppa San
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    Poppa San Pray daily and take the plunge for Eli Staff Member Moderator

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    You dug up one of the oldest dead threads on this forum just to say that? WoW!
  9. Vltrophy
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    Vltrophy Cheesehead

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    Just wanted to see what some of the old threads were. Saw Purdue & just had to comment
  10. Terre Haute Cheesehead
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    Terre Haute Cheesehead Cheesehead

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    OK, I'll play, too! This one's for you, Vltrophy > well, and for me too :D

    Sorry, couldn't resist. Just hope a "mod" is not a "Boiler" fan. "Boiler Up" Paint Crew :sleep:

    124458_Funny-Sports-Sign_620.jpg
    • Winner Winner x 1
  11. Vltrophy
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    Vltrophy Cheesehead

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    Got to love that pic Terre Haute Cheesehead got to love that pic
  12. Terre Haute Cheesehead
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    Terre Haute Cheesehead Cheesehead

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    Remember the line from the movie "Judgement Night" when the vicious drug gang was scattering all those bums from a railroad yard? One of the homeless men grabs Cuba Gooding's Purdue letter jacket then is shot dead while trying to run away and the leader of the drug gang, Fallon (Denis Leary) says:

    Sh!t. Hobo from Purdue. I hate Purdue. When's the last time they ever won anything anyway?
    • Agree Agree x 1
  13. Terre Haute Cheesehead
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    Terre Haute Cheesehead Cheesehead

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    Well, on a serious note! Pot meet Kettle! Impossible to throw stones at Purdue's football program when I'm a Hoosier fan and they give up about 50 plus points per game and have the worst decision making and play calling coach on the planet. If Wilson concentrated more on improving his defense instead of focusing on which "color" helmet the players are going to wear each week, maybe the games wouldn't be boat races.
  14. Bignutz
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    Bignutz I'm a victim of coicumstances!

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    Pumpkin Shuckers?

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